Shakespeare: Original pronunciation (The Open University)

Описание

An introduction by David and Ben Crystal to the 'Original Pronunciation' production of Shakespeare and what they reveal about the history of the English language.

Transcript link - http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/english-language/speaking-shakespeare-how-was-shakespeare-pronounced-when-he-was-writing

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The smarter you are, the more successful you'll be - right? But, Is a person's IQ really the most important factor oftheir success? Let's take a look at the smartest human on earth! Subscribe for more! ► https://goo.gl/pgcoq1 ◄ Stay updated ► https://goo.gl/JyGcTt https://goo.gl/5c8dzr ◄ For copyright queries or general inquiries please get in touch: [email protected] Before I tell you about the most intelligent person in the world, and what he’s doing with his amazing gift, let's find out the science behind intelligence and success. One of the mostwell-known psychologists who studied intelligence in children, attempting to decode how a person’s success can be predicted by their IQas a child, was Lewis Terman. He set out to show that IQ was of central importance to achievement and attainment. Mr. Langan is a prime example of how the link between intelligence and success is not as solid as Terman and other studies suggest. In fact, the popular notion linking natural talent to success is wrong, according to Journalist and author, Malcolm Gladwell as written in his book Outliers. A more accurate ‘model of success’, is dependent on numerous factors, as you’re about to find out.

2 месяцев назад
Norway's Borders Explained - The Exception To EVERYTHING

Norway's Borders Explained - The Exception To EVERYTHING

There's Norway I'd ever write a country pun instead of a real description If you want to see a specific type of video (travel, a particular lets play or the geography stuff) check here: https://www.youtube.com/user/ibx2cat/playlists Free month of Amazon prime (faster shipping) and Amazon video (one of the best and cheapest TV/movie streaming services): US - http://amzn.to/1heDFe8 UK - http://amzn.to/1rhGoYm Want to know what I use for my recording/gaming setup? https://www.amazon.com/shop/ibxtoycat Check out my main channel at http://youtube.com/ibxtoycat Also on twitter @ibxtoycat

11 месяцев назад
10 Signs  You’re Way More Intelligent Than You Realize

10 Signs You’re Way More Intelligent Than You Realize

You are way more intelligent than you realize! Here's a list of signs that actually indicate a super bright mind. They are all scientifically proved, so if you feel like a few of them are true for you, you have every reason to call yourself a genius! TIMESTAMPS You realize how much you don’t know 0:48 You wear the same clothes every day 2:00 You can feel what others are thinking 3:01 You can perfectly control yourself 3:50 Your eyes are blue 4:53 You are a chocolate lover 5:54 When you’re upset, you know what’s bothering you 6:56 You talk to yourself 7:47 You can’t stand any background noise 8:35 Your handwriting is messy 9:21 SUMMARY - Justin Kruger and David Dunning worked with a group of Cornell University undergrads and published the results of their research in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology in 1999. They asked students to predict their scores after being tested in Humor, Logical reasoning and English Grammar. Those who were 100% sure they did outstandingly well ended up with worse results than those who were more critical of themselves. - Psychologist Oliver Burkeman has done some serious research on the lifestyle of the brightest minds in the world. He concluded that smart people tend to save up their mental abilities for more important things. Unless those smart people are fashion designers or Lady Gaga, of course. - Empathy is a sign of exceptional mental intelligence. If you are emotionally intelligent, you love meeting new people and learning new things. According to psychologist and author of Focus: The Hidden Drivers of Excellence Daniel Goleman, people who care a lot about others and can feel them well, generally, succeed in life. - The ability to control instincts is what we know distinguishes humans from animals. Genius people went even further: they manage to overcome and control any impulses they have. If you can plan and achieve goals without being distracted by emotions you are more intelligent than you might imagine. - Professor emeritus of the University of Louisville Joanne Rowe has concluded light-eyed humans, and even animals are way better at activities requiring self-pacing than the dark-eyed creatures. The fact that you are better at self-paced activities means that you like paying attention to every detail. - M.D. Franz H. Messerli, who is most likely a chocolate lover himself, published the results of his study in The New England Journal of Medicine. He tried to link genius (Noble prize winner kind of genius) per ten million people with the amount of chocolate consumed in certain countries. And he found it. - Genius people don’t stick to the past. And, they don’t blame everyone and everything around for their sadness. Psychologist Daniel Goleman explains a real genius does not only address problems but also recognizes emotions when he feels them, and not ignores them. - Psychologists Daniel Swigley and Gary Lupyan conducted a whole study on it. The good self-talk, according to them, helps us sort the important thoughts from useless stuff going through our minds. - A study conducted at the Northwestern University has stated that a genius hates any kind of background noise because it prevents him from concentrating on important issues. - Next time someone criticizes your handwriting, simply nod, say “I am sorry you don’t get it” and triumph on the inside. Messy writing is one of the signs of a genius! Did you recognize any of these signs in yourself, or maybe you are now positive your best friend is a genius? Feel free to share it in the comments section. Subscribe to Bright Side : https://goo.gl/rQTJZz ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Our Social Media: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/brightside/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/brightgram/ SMART Youtube: https://goo.gl/JTfP6L 5-Minute Crafts Youtube: https://www.goo.gl/8JVmuC Have you ever seen a talking slime? Here he is – Slick Slime Sam: https://goo.gl/zarVZo ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- For more videos and articles visit: http://www.brightside.me/

11 месяцев назад
Shakespeare; The Globe Theatre London tour

Shakespeare; The Globe Theatre London tour

A virtual tour of The Globe Theatre London, home to Shakespeare's theatrical performances. Please subscribe to keep our channel alive

5 лет назад
Why some speakers can't understand speakers who understand them - Asymmetric Intelligibility

Why some speakers can't understand speakers who understand them - Asymmetric Intelligibility

Sometimes two languages are close enough that speakers of one understand the other. But it's not always fair. It's easier for Danish speakers to understand Swedish than the other way around. Same goes for Portuguese and Spanish. Many other languages, too. How come? Subscribe for language: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=NativLang Become my patron: https://www.patreon.com/NativLang/overview ~ Briefly ~ In this animation I'll share a couple cases of this strange uneven understanding. I'll tell you about a time I witnessed it myself, then take out a map and journey to Scandinavia, where this kind of thing is normal. With Scandinavian languages in hand, we'll think about the terms "mutual intelligibility" and "asymmetric intelligibility". We'll see three factors at work: attitude, exposure, language. Journeying into that last one, we'll look at results of studies that try to relate Scandinavia's linguistic differences to asymmetric difficulties in understanding. We'll hit a snag that requires a bit more research before concluding it's not entirely about the languages themselves. I'll end with some quick examples, including ones that patrons pointed out when they voted for this video. ~ Credits ~ Art, animation, narration and some of the music by Josh from NativLang Doc full of sources for claims made and images, music, sfx, fonts used: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1oHh187AWkbZFiICj5wwgyOM4-9Go44p-dQr7BBGrHD8/ Music that's not by me: Tickled Pink Josh Woodward - http://joshwoodward.com/ Marty Gots a Plan, Silver Flame, Thinking Music, Cheery Monday Kevin MacLeod - https://www.incompetech.com

5 месяцев назад
10 American Words That Completely Confuse Brits!

10 American Words That Completely Confuse Brits!

There are some American words that completely confuse us Brits. Sometimes it feels like a different language! So I have collected together 10 Americans that confuse British people the most. Some of them I had never heard before until researching for this video. If you know any other American English words that are confusing or if you are an American who find British words confusing, let me know in the comments below. Recommended English Resources: - *English Grammar In Use - https://amzn.to/2EUo3ZS - *English Idioms In Use - https://amzn.to/2HrFK84 - *English Phrasal Verbs In Use - https://amzn.to/2EOEaIh *IMPROVE YOUR LISTENING WITH AUDIBLE - http://bit.ly/2AoARJ6 If you enjoyed this video please SHARE it with anyone you know studying English and of course hit the LIKE button. Stay connected with me on social media - Website: http://www.eatsleepdreamenglish.com/ - Instagram: https://bit.ly/2JewHsg - Facebook: https://en-gb.facebook.com/eatsleepdreamenglish/ - Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/EatSleepDreamEnglish.com Camera: Canon G7X Editing Software: Final Cut Pro X Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) *affiliate links

5 месяцев назад
Secrets of the Stone Age (1/2) | DW Documentary

Secrets of the Stone Age (1/2) | DW Documentary

During the Stone Age, humans shifted from the nomadic lifestyle to the more settled life of farmers. A documentary on an important period of human history. Watch Part 2 here: https://youtu.be/XSGRd5Ve1zI Around 12,000 years ago, humans underwent a transition from nomads to settlers. That epoch, the Stone Age, produced monumental building works. Part 1 of this two-part documentary illuminates the cultural background of these structures and shows the difficulties Stone Age humans had to contend with. Until around 10,000 BC, humans lived as hunters and gatherers. Then an irreversible change began. Settlements formed. "For millions of years humans lived as foragers and suddenly their lives changed radically. This was far more radical than the start of the digital age or industrialization," says prehistorian Hermann Parzinger, president of the Prussian Cultural Heritage Foundation. For a long time, scholars believed that a sedentary lifestyle was a prerequisite for constructing large buildings. Then archaeologist Klaus Schmidt discovered Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, a 12,000-year-old complex of stone blocks weighing up to 20 tons. Its builders were still hunter- gatherers. They decorated the stone columns with ornate animal reliefs. How these structures were used and who was allowed access to them remains a mystery. But we now know that the site was abandoned and covered over once settlements took root. Human development continued its course. The discovery of agriculture and animal husbandry led to larger settlements, a changed diet and ultimately to dependence on material goods. This social upheaval in the late Neolithic period has influenced our lives up to the present day. But experts agree that the monuments of the Stone Age prove that humans have gigantomanic tendencies and a need to immortalize themselves. _______ DW Documentary gives you knowledge beyond the headlines. Watch high-class documentaries from German broadcasters and international production companies. Meet intriguing people, travel to distant lands, get a look behind the complexities of daily life and build a deeper understanding of current affairs and global events. Subscribe and explore the world around you with DW Documentary. Subscribe to DW Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCW39zufHfsuGgpLviKh297Q?sub_confirmation=1# For more documentaries visit: http://www.dw.com/en/tv/docfilm/s-3610 Instagram https://www.instagram.com/dwdocumentary/ Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/dw.stories DW netiquette policy: http://www.dw.com/en/dws-netiquette-policy/a-5300954

4 месяцев назад
Treasures of the Bodleian: Shakespeare's 'First Folio'

Treasures of the Bodleian: Shakespeare's 'First Folio'

An introduction to Shakespeare's 'First Folio' by Dr Emma Smith, Fellow in English, University of Oxford.

7 лет назад
What Montezuma's Aztec Sounded Like - and how we know

What Montezuma's Aztec Sounded Like - and how we know

The Aztecs didn't call him Montezuma. Nor Moctezuma. They didn't call chocolate "chocolate". Heck, they didn't even call themselves Aztec! Though they were an oral culture, we have an idea of what their language really sounded like. Here's why. Subscribe for language: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=NativLang Follow my progress or become a patron: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=584038 ~ Corrections ~ As Rodrigo Chacón comments, the transitive "nicua" is not used alone. Instead, expect to find "nitlacua" (indefinite -tla-) or "niccua" (definite -c-). Here's a better illustration for building the verb: "ni___cua". ~ Are you reading instead of watching? (no spoilers) ~ He's commonly known to English-speakers as Montezuma and Moctezuma in Spanish, but his language is a different story. Travel to Mexico and dig into language history. Look at early colonial writers and grammarians, learn their strengths and limitations, then move onto some surprising old and new evidence. Along the way, you'll learn what the Aztecs called themselves and their language and how they really said "chocolate". You'll study a bit of their fancy grammar. You'll hear me take a shot at pronouncing the reconstructed form of Montezuma's own name as it would've been pronounced in old Tenochtitlan. You'll see how it took modern linguistics to sort out some of the historical evolution of the language's sounds from classical to modern times. Finally, you'll learn about the dramatic differences between common speech and ritual speech. In the end, you can see how the pronunciation, grammar and style leave us with an understanding of Montezuma that's more complex, but also more beautiful, than if his language were a simple Mexican monolith. ~ CREDITS ~ Art, narration and animation by Josh from NativLang. Some of the music, too. Sources for claims and credits for sfx, images and music: https://docs.google.com/document/d/1BGaFnFZ9SJN1QjK2-FlgnvoF5EGoRiIkTZd09mCVEVo/

2 лет назад
The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

Help support videos like this: https://www.patreon.com/cgpgrey T-Shirts: http://store.dftba.com/collections/cgp-grey Grey's blog: http://www.cgpgrey.com/blog/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/cgpgrey

8 лет назад
Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana | 2018 World Chess Championship | Game 4

Magnus Carlsen vs Fabiano Caruana | 2018 World Chess Championship | Game 4

World Chess Champion Magnus Carlsen of Norway defends his title against challenger Fabiano Caruana of the United States in Game 2 of the 2018 World Chess Championship match that is being held in London. It's a best of 12 games where the first player to earn 6.5 points earns the lion's share of a $1.14 million prize pool, and the title of "World Chess Champion". Both players entered game 4 with 1.5 points each. A new opening in this match surfaces in game 4 with Carlsen electing the English Opening. Caruana's 6th move is not the most popular option, yet one which ultimately makes Carlsen, in yet another game, have a think first. Carlsen's 14th move is followed in an illogical way, with the game soon transitioning to an endgame where both sides of the board experience play. PGN: 1. c4 e5 2. Nc3 Nf6 3. Nf3 Nc6 4. g3 { A29 English Opening: King's English Variation, Four Knights Variation, Fianchetto Line } d5 5. cxd5 Nxd5 6. Bg2 Bc5 7. O-O O-O 8. d3 Re8 9. Bd2 Nxc3 10. Bxc3 Nd4 11. b4 Bd6 12. Rb1 Nxf3+ 13. Bxf3 a6 14. a4 c6 15. Re1 Bd7 16. e3 Qf6 17. Be4 Bf5 18. Qf3 Bxe4 19. Qxf6 gxf6 20. dxe4 b5 21. Red1 Bf8 22. axb5 axb5 23. Kg2 Red8 24. Rdc1 Kg7 25. Be1 Rdc8 26. Rc2 Ra4 27. Kf3 h5 28. Ke2 Kg6 29. h3 f5 30. exf5+ Kxf5 31. f3 Be7 32. e4+ Ke6 33. Bd2 Bd6 34. Rbc1 Internet Chess Club (ICC) Software: Blitzin http://bit.ly/179O93N I'm a self-taught National Master in chess out of Pennsylvania, USA who was introduced to the game by my father in 1988 at the age of 8. The purpose of this channel is to share my knowledge of chess to help others improve their game. I enjoy continuing to improve my understanding of this great game, albeit slowly. Consider subscribing here on YouTube for frequent content, and/or connecting via any or all of the below social medias. Your support is greatly appreciated. Take care, bye. :D ★ LIVESTREAM http://twitch.tv/ChessNetwork ★ FACEBOOK http://facebook.com/ChessNetwork ★ TWITTER http://twitter.com/ChessNetwork ★ GOOGLE+ http://google.com/+ChessNetwork ★ PATREON https://www.patreon.com/ChessNetwork ★ DONATE https://www.paypal.com/cgi-bin/webscr?cmd=_s-xclick&hosted_button_id=QLV226E6FUUWG

2 дней назад
Sound like a native speaker: Advanced Pronunciation

Sound like a native speaker: Advanced Pronunciation

http://www.engvid.com Do you want to pronounce words correctly? By the end of this lesson, you will even be able to correct native speakers! I'll teach you some very commonly mispronounced English vocabulary. You'll learn some words that English students mispronounce, other words that native speakers pronounce incorrectly, as well as some general pronunciation rules in English, so that you can speak English correctly and confidently. To keep learning English for free, subscribe to my YouTube channel, EnglishByJade! http://youtube.com/user/EnglishByJade TRANSCRIPT Hello, everyone. I'm Jade. We're talking about commonly mispronounced words today in this pronounciation lesson. No, pronunciation lesson. So I'm going to mention words that people say in the wrong way sometimes, maybe because they're not easy to read these words or maybe because a lot of people say them wrong, therefore, you learnt to say them in a way that's wrong. The first things we're going to look at are not words, they're letters. I'm telling you this because I've mentioned this before in videos that sometimes in Britain, you're judged. No, you're always judged by your language in Britain. So when you say these letters, some people will listen to how you say those letters and they'll judge you if you say it in the wrong way, and they're like: "Oh, you're not educated", or: "Oh, that's very common", as in not being... Having the right parents and the right kind of background. So, the first letter, a lot of people say: "haitch", with a "ha" sound, but according to people who decide these things, you're not meant to say: "haitch", you're meant to say without it: "aitch", according to them, so there you go. And what about this letter? How do you say this letter? Do you say: "dubya"? Well, this one is meant to be: "double-u". So we're going to cross those ones out. Moving on, some of them are tricks because the verb for this is: "pronounced." We "pronounce" words, but when we say the noun, it changes; it becomes: "pronunciation." And I've had people say things to me in my videos before: "Oh, you're saying that word wrong." Well, no, no, I know that I'm not. You're wrong. Okay? I know you're wrong. Trust me on that one. So now you know. Okay? You can do that to other people when they tell you you're wrong because it's like you've got... When someone does that, you can say: "You've got egg on your face." Okay? "You're wrong because you tried to tell me I was wrong, but in fact, you were wrong. Now you've got egg on your face." So anyway, "pronunciation." This one, it's a hard word to spell. So I can hear creative... This is... Wouldn't be a native speaker on this one. Creative interpretations of this word, let's say that, usually like: "ton-gu" or something. Sounds like a game that you can play, but "ton-gu" is not right. It's: "tongue", that's a bit weird, I'm not going to do that in my video. Looking at this word now: "height". I think this one breaks our expectations, you could say, because the other words related to it: "width", "length", have the "th" sound. "Width", "length". This one, not spelt the same way, doesn't have the same sound. So it should be: "height", "height", not: "heigth", a lot of people say: "heigth". Wrong. Right: "height" with a "t". So it's the exception, it doesn't... Doesn't go with "width" or "length". Are there any others? "Depth", "depth", oh, that's hard for me to say. "Depth", too hard for me to say. Looking at the next word now, a non... A non-native mistake: "suit", "suit". Some people say: "suite", "suite", all kinds of wrong pronunciations for that one. Thing to remember there is it's the long "u" sound, "oo", "suit", "suit".

4 лет назад
Ancient Human Genomes...Present-Day Europeans - Johannes Krause

Ancient Human Genomes...Present-Day Europeans - Johannes Krause

Public Lecture - March 19, 2015 Johannes Krause Professor of Archaeology and Paleogenetics at the University of Tübingen and Director of the Max Plank Institute for the Science of Human History in Jena In this lecture, Krause explores the methods used to investigate European population history about the time of agricultural transition. Using genome data, Krause explains how at least three ancestral groups, the Hunter-Gathers, the Early Farmers and the Ancient North Eurasians, contributed genetic material to present-day Europeans. Krause also discusses these three ancestral populations discovered from this data and explores their connection to present-day Europeans. This lecture is made possible by the Dr. S.T. Lee Fund for Historical Studies. More videos on http://video.ias.edu

3 лет назад