Shakespeare: Original pronunciation (The Open University)

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An introduction by David and Ben Crystal to the 'Original Pronunciation' production of Shakespeare and what they reveal about the history of the English language.

For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw

Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.ac.uk/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/english-language

Transcript link - http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/english-language/speaking-shakespeare-how-was-shakespeare-pronounced-when-he-was-writing

Study ' Shakespeare: text and performance' at the Open University: http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/u214.htm

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20 Common Characteristics of Highly Intelligent People. Create stunning video intro for your channel here http://bit.ly/2sEaMPK . In this video, I'm going to show you 20 common characteristics of highly intelligent people. But before we start, make sure to like this video and subscribe our channel so you won't miss any interesting updates in the future guys! Also, don't forget to check link on the description below to see our interesting offer that might be useful for you. Here are 20 common characteristics to look for in highly intelligent people: 1. THEY’RE DISORGANIZED 2. THEY’RE ADAPTABLE 3. THEY USE CURSE WORDS 4. THEY UNDERSTAND LIMITS 5. See the rest of the list on this video ... ------------------------------------------------------------------ Other amazing videos: 15 Signs To Identify Highly Intelligent Person, Backed By Science: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xqho_MX7XrU 10 Signs You're Smarter Than Average, Backed By Science: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hjuh0WnniXU This Is The Schedules Of Successful People Look Like: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x64iolZS0_8 ------------------------------------------------------------------ Gear We Use: Iphone 7: https://goo.gl/PaC9W2 Sony a6500 Camera: https://goo.gl/ArXQcZ Sony a7R II Camera: https://goo.gl/jhR5Fl Sony 35mm Lens: https://goo.gl/XEYgcM Sony 55mm Lens: https://goo.gl/Ua4F8n Sony 90mm Lens: https://goo.gl/plWU2U Sony 24-70mm Lens: https://goo.gl/KD0N8R Sony 70-200mm Lens: https://goo.gl/uIJMss Taylor Guitars: https://goo.gl/wyFziR elixir Acoustic Strings: https://goo.gl/rONu6b PRS Electrics: https://goo.gl/10P3L5 Meinl Cajon: https://goo.gl/uZtRBm Yamaha Digital Piano: https://goo.gl/70JIhk Audio Technica Mic: https://goo.gl/p4lQ2i Shure Mic: https://goo.gl/K2YJLI Fotodiox Flapjack Light: https://goo.gl/V9e2rT Phantom 4 Drone: https://goo.gl/uWvkwt Zhiyun Crane Gimbal: https://goo.gl/PQ0HWH ------------------------------------------------------------------ Subscribe : https://www.youtube.com/c/BehindTheScienceFacts?sub_confirmation=1 ------------------------------------------------------------------ Source: http://www.theclever.com

1 лет назад
One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

Siobhan Thompson performs a tour of the accents of the British Isles - and the celebrities who speak with them! Five lessons to help you do a better British accent here: http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2014/04/five-lessons-help-sort-british-accent/ Photos via AP Images. Follow Anglophenia on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Tumblr: http://anglophenia.tumblr.com Follow Siobhan Thompson on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/vornietom

4 лет назад
The Albanians: Europe's Original 'White Muslims'

The Albanians: Europe's Original 'White Muslims'

Who on Earth are the Albanians: the enigmatic, mostly Islamic peoples of the Balkans? Today we're going to delve into some of the history of Albania and the Albanians in depth, including their origin, the country itself, the Greater Albania region and a global diaspora that easily rivals that of the Armenians, Greeks and others in terms of size and impact. Please let me know your thoughts on the Albanian nation and their emergence over the centuries. Sorry about the gap guys, still getting over the flu, but I'm pushing through! Thanks for watching! Sources: http://www.balkaninsight.com/en/article/claims-about-old-albanian-leave-scholars-lost-for-words

7 месяцев назад
The Truth About Aldi's Really Low Prices

The Truth About Aldi's Really Low Prices

If you're new, Subscribe! → http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-Mashed If you've ever shopped at Aldi, you know they save you money. Lots of money. Their legions of fans will attest to the fact that they're not selling cheap, inferior products — so how do they get those prices so low? It turns out there are a ton of ways Aldi got creative with cutting costs so they can pass those savings on to you. Let's break down how they really do it… Prime time | 0:20 Taking the air out | 0:54 Help us out | 1:28 They spend extra upfront | 1:58 Just the essentials | 2:33 Private label | 3:31 Produce and perishables | 3:58 Just in time, just enough | 4:39 Stocking shelves the easy way | 5:17 Do you work here? | 5:54 Energy efficiency | 6:42 BYO Bag | 7:16 Read more here → http://www.mashed.com/91780/aldi-gets-prices-low/ Website → http://www.mashed.com/ Like us → https://www.facebook.com/MashedFood/ Instagram → https://www.instagram.com/mashedfood/ Pinterest → https://www.pinterest.com/mashedfood/ Mashed is the ultimate destination for food lovers. Whether you're just learning how to cook or ready to take your kitchen skills to the next level, Mashed has all the tips and tricks you'll ever need to be a chef… Or at least enough hacks to help you fake it til you make it. We’ve got your back at every step, from grocery shopping smarts to serving a perfectly prepared dish. Would you rather eat out than whip it up yourself? Mashed has all the info you’ll need for that, too — from the best and worst foods to order at your favorite restaurants, to what today’s most popular chefs really have up their sleeves. No matter what kind of foodie you are, Mashed has your recipe for success.

5 месяцев назад
15,000-Year-Old Words We Still Use

15,000-Year-Old Words We Still Use

There are words we speak today that cavemen would have understood. Anthony tells us which words these are and why they're so significant. Read More: Linguists Identify 15,000-Year-Old "Ultraconserved Words" http://www.washingtonpost.com/national/health-science/linguists-identify-15000-year-old-ultraconserved-words/2013/05/06/a02e3a14-b427-11e2-9a98-4be1688d7d84_story.html "It's an odd little speech. But if you went back 15,000 years and spoke these words to hunter-gatherers in Asia in any one of hundreds of modern languages, there is a chance they would understand at least some of what you were saying." "Ultraconserved Words Point to Deep Language Ancestry Across Eurasia" http://www.pnas.org/content/early/2013/05/01/1218726110 "The search for ever deeper relationships among the World's languages is bedeviled by the fact that most words evolve too rapidly to preserve evidence of their ancestry beyond 5,000 to 9,000 years." Indo-European languages: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indo-European_languages Italic languages: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Italic_languages ____________________ DNews is dedicated to satisfying your curiosity and to bringing you mind-bending stories & perspectives you won't find anywhere else! New videos twice daily. Watch More http://www.youtube.com/dnewschannel Subscribe http://www.youtube.com/channel/UCzWQYUVCpZqtN93H8RR44Qw?sub_confirmation=1 DNews Twitter http://twitter.com/dnews Anthony Carboni Twitter http://twitter.com/acarboni Laci Green Twitter http://twitter.com/gogreen18 Trace Dominguez Twitter http://twitter.com/trace501 DNews Facebook http://facebook.com/dnews DNews Google+ http://gplus.to/dnews DNews Website http://discoverynews.com

5 лет назад
David Crystal - Shakespeare Anniversary

David Crystal - Shakespeare Anniversary

From the interview with David Crystal in Belgrade on 9 November 2013 Interviewer: Tony O'Brien, British Council Director Western Balkans

5 лет назад
The OLDEST, Shortest & Weirdest Border In The World - SPAIN

The OLDEST, Shortest & Weirdest Border In The World - SPAIN

Spain has the worlds most interesting borders; including The Oldest Border in the world The Shortest Border in the world & The most accidental border?? Here's a run down on all of them http://reddit.com/r/toycat - Discuss this video http://flattr.com/@ibxtoycat - Support Every Channel You Watch If you want to see a specific type of video (travel, a particular lets play or the geography stuff) check here: https://www.youtube.com/user/ibx2cat/playlists Free month of Amazon prime (faster shipping) and Amazon video (one of the best and cheapest TV/movie streaming services): US - http://amzn.to/1heDFe8 UK - http://amzn.to/1rhGoYm Want to know what I use for my recording/gaming setup? https://www.amazon.com/shop/ibxtoycat Check out my main channel at http://youtube.com/ibxtoycat Also on twitter @ibxtoycat also just to mention this video has nothing to do with the Spanish (Rajoy) government being struck down a few hours before it went live!

4 месяцев назад
8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

Take your English to the next level by learning eight pronunciation tips that will help you sound like a native speaker. These tips apply to a British English accent or a neutral English accent. In this lesson, you will learn about -ed and -ing word endings, the difference in pronunciation between the north and south of England, the schwa sound, the pronunciation of the R sound in English, the tricky "th" sound, and more. Whether you want to perfect your pronunciation or learn about different accents, this video is for you. After watching, complete the quiz to test your understanding. http://www.engvid.com/8-tips-for-british-english-pronunciation/ Want to train your British accent? Get my free British accent training pack: https://jadejoddle.com/coaching-tools/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is some pronunciation tips for British English. Some of them are tips; some of them are observations that you might be interested to know. We've got eight of them, so let's get started. Pronunciation of-ed word endings. This is not specifically a British English issue. If your preference -- I don't know why I can't speak suddenly in an English pronunciation video, but that's how it is. If your preference is American English, this also applies to American English. So what I hear a lot at, sort of, around intermediate level -- sometimes upper intermediate level if you haven't had someone to correct you -- -ed word endings sound like this. I can't even do it because it's so unnatural for me. "Excite-ed shout-ed, remind-ed." It's so unnatural for me. But in fact, it's not like that. It doesn't sound like an -ed. It might sound like an /id/; it might sound like a /t/; or it might sound like a /d/. So I've got some examples here. This word, even though it's spelled -ed, makes an /id/ sound. It becomes "excited". "I'm really excited." "Shouted." "He shouted at me." "Reminded." "I reminded you to do your homework; didn't I?" And -- yeah. So now, we can talk about the ones that finish with a t sound. "Finished. Dripped. Laughed." They don't have the-ed sound. So that's an important thing to know about pronunciation. Even if it's spelled-ed, it doesn't mean it sounds like that. And what about the ones that end with a d sound, a "duh" sound. "Remembered." "I remembered what you said to me." "Called." "I called you. Didn't you hear your phone?" "Imagined." "I imagined a better future for everyone." So with those, it's a D sound. How do you know for each one? Go with what feels most natural when you're saying the word. The main thing is don't force the -ed sound at the end of the word because it's that that gives you an unnatural rhythm when you're speaking English. So moving on to -- this one's an observation, really. British English pronunciation. We have so many different accents in England. But one of the biggest divisions in our accents is -- it's between the north of the country and the south, and it's our pronunciation of these words: "bath" and "laugh", as I say them. I say them in the southern pronunciation. But if I were from the north -- if I were from the north of the country, I'd say "bath" and "laugh" because they have a different accent up there. Well, they've got loads of different accents, but they don't speak in the same way as me. So let's break it down into the actual sound. So if you're from the North, you say, "a". But we, in the South, say "au". So you say "bath", we say "bauth". And you say "laf"; we say "laugh". And you can also hear it in these two words. It doesn't have to be the first or only a vowel in the word. In the southern pronunciation, this is "commaund". But in the northern pronunciation, it's "command". And the southern pronunciation of this word is "caust". The northern pronunciation is "cast". The cast of Brookside came to London." "Brookside" was an old soap that's not on TV anymore, and it was people from Liverpool. And I was just doing the accent. Probably that's really irrelevant to you. You will never see that show, but anyway. You know, now. Next tip. I don't hear this that often, but when I do, it sounds really, really, really wrong. And I think this tip generally -- generally a good example of how -- just because we write something one way doesn't mean we say it that way. So in English -- American English, too -- W sounding words are the same as the "wh" sound in words for spelling. It actually sounds the same. So we've got two words here, "wine" and "whine". One is spelled with WH, and one is just spelled with I. "Whine" is a kind of moan or a kind of cry. Sometimes, young children whine. Sometimes, women who are upset about something are said to be "whiny".

4 лет назад
The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

The Difference between the United Kingdom, Great Britain and England Explained

Help support videos like this: https://www.patreon.com/cgpgrey T-Shirts: http://store.dftba.com/collections/cgp-grey Grey's blog: http://www.cgpgrey.com/blog/ Twitter: http://twitter.com/cgpgrey

8 лет назад
Did Shakespeare write his plays? - Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams

Did Shakespeare write his plays? - Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams

View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/did-shakespeare-write-his-plays-natalya-st-clair-and-aaron-williams Some people question whether Shakespeare really wrote the works that bear his name – or whether he even existed at all. Could it be true that the greatest writer in the English language was as fictional as his plays? Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams show how a linguistic tool called stylometry might shed light on the answer. Lesson by Natalya St. Clair and Aaron Williams, animation by Pink Kong Studios.

4 лет назад
3 tips for sounding like a native speaker

3 tips for sounding like a native speaker

"That'll be 66 cents please." "Sikysi... what?" Having a hard time understanding native speed English? This lesson will give you some tips on how to sound like a native speaker as well as how to understand what you hear by breaking down expressions into their individual word and sounds. https://www.engvid.com/3-tips-for-sounding-like-a-native-speaker/ TRANSCRIPT Hi again, welcome back to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. Today, I'm going to help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker, hopefully. Students ask me all the time: "How can I sound like a native speaker?" Well, before I say anything, let me just tell you that it will take time and a lot, a lot, a lot of practice. The best way is to live in an English-speaking country, of course, but of course you can do it anywhere, but it takes time; be patient, practice, practice, practice. So we're looking at pronunciation. Let me start with this word: "pronunciation". Not: "pronounciation". It is not a pronoun. A pronoun is: "I", "me", "my", "mine". Pronunciation is how we speak English. So I'm going to give you three tips that will help you sound a little bit more like a native speaker. We're going to start with connecting words. Now, think about your own language, whether you're speaking Spanish or Polish or Chinese, you do this in your language as well. When you're speaking fast, you're taking words and you're squeezing them together; you're connecting them, so one word flows into the next word. That's what we're going to do here. You can connect consonants to consonants. What this means: when a word ends in a consonant... A consonant is "b", "c", "d", "f", "g", etc. A vowel is "a", "e", "i", "o", "u". When a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins with the same consonant, drop the first one. So for example: we do not say: "black coffee", we don't say: "ke, ke". There's only one "k": "bla coffee", "bla coffee." Okay? Practice that. Now, "t" and "d", these are two different consonants, but according to the tongue and the mouth, they almost sound the same so we do the same thing. "Wha do you do?", "Wha do you do?" But again, another thing you have to keep in mind is when we say it fast, we also don't really say "e", we say like a... Sort of like a small... We don't say "o" - sorry -, we say sort of a small "e". "Wha do ye do?" Practice that. "Wha do ye do?" Strange, huh? No "t", "wha", "de ye do?", "Wha de ye do?" That's how a native speaker would say it naturally. Now, another thing is when a word ends in a consonant and the next word begins in a vowel, make sure you roll it in. Right? Roll the consonant into the vowel and separate the syllable before. A syllable is the vowel sounds in a word. Okay? So nobody, like native speakers don't say: "Not at all. Oh no, not at all." We don't say it like that. We say: "Oh, not-at-all.", "Not-at-all.", "Not-at-all." Right? The "t", so this becomes: "No-ta-tall", "No-ta-tall", "Not at all". Okay? Say it quickly, blend the letters one into the next. But again, practice it. Now, for those of you who are going to be taking a test, an English test that involves listening; IELTS, TOEFL, TOEIC, if you're in Canada you're maybe doing a CELPIP test. Okay? This is going to help you on the listening section as well. This is one of the things they're testing. Somebody on the recording will say: "Not-at-all", and you need to cut: "Not at all", you need to understand the separate words, that's part of the test. So practice speaking it, practice listening to it. Another thing we do is we squeeze some words. Okay? Certain words, we don't say all the syllables, we don't even say all the letters. I've heard many students say: "Com-fort-able", "com-fort-able", but native speakers, we don't say this part, we don't say the "or". We say: "Comf-ta-bil", and notice the last sound is like a small tiny, tiny little "i" in there. "Comftabil", "comf-ta-bil", "comftabil". Okay? We don't pronounce the "or": "Comfortable". Nope, don't do that. Another word like that: "Interesting". "In-chre-sting". Find out what the syllables are so: "In-ter" - sorry, my mistake -, "In-ter-rest-ing". If you want to emphasize something, we have a word called: "enunciate". When someone wants to emphasize a word, then they enunciate each syllable; they say each syllable separately. "Oh, that is very in-ter-est-ing." Right? Because I want you to understand that the word is interesting, but in every day speech: "Intresting", "in-tre-sting". "In-ter-est-ing", I have four syllables, when I actually say it naturally, it becomes three syllables and the "t" and the "r" become like a "ch", but that's... We'll talk about that next. Another word: "every". "E-vry". I don't say: "Ev-er-y", I don't say this letter "e", "ev-er-y". "E-vry", "evryone", "evrything", "evry".

5 лет назад
Teen Speaks Over 20 Languages

Teen Speaks Over 20 Languages

Prodigy hyper-polyglot Tim Doner has been teaching himself languages since he was 13. He now speaks nearly 20 languages! Join Tim on a cultural tour of New York unlike any you've ever heard! See more of Tim: http://www.youtube.com/polyglotpal PRODIGIES is a bi-weekly series showcasing the youngest and brightest as they challenge themselves to reach new heights and the stories behind them. Created and produced by @radical.media, THNKR gives you extraordinary access to the people, stories, places and thinking that will change your mind. Follow THNKR on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/thnkr Like us on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/thnkrtv Check out our Pinterest: http://pinterest.com/thnkr/ SUBSCRIBE! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=thnkrtv

5 лет назад
HIS101 - From IE to OE

HIS101 - From IE to OE

This E-Lecture deals with the development from Indo-European to Old English with special emphasis on the grouping of English into the branches of Indo-European. The focus is historical rather than linguistic. However, in order to understand the linguistic principles underlying this development, it is recommended to consult the E-Lecture "Language Reconstruction" first.

6 лет назад