Learn British accents and dialects – Cockney, RP, Northern, and more!

Описание

Did you know that there are over 30 different English accents in England alone? And that's not all. Would you believe there are over a hundred different English dialects accross the world? In this lesson, I will tell you about some common British accents you might hear. You'll hear examples of Cockney, RP, Estuary, Northern, Scottish, Welsh, and many more accents. Don't miss this opportunity to add some spice to your English pronunciation and comprehension! Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/learn-british-accents-and-dialects-cockney-rp-northern-and-more/

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is about accents in the U.K. So, U.K. accents and also dialects. Okay, so what's the difference between an accent and a dialect? Right. Well, an accent, as you know, is to do with pronunciation, how you pronounce the word. Dialect is when you have a word that only people in a certain area of the country use; it's not a national word, it's a local word that maybe people from other parts of the country, they won't even know what it means, so that's dialect. Okay. So, let's just have a look through some of the accents that we have in the U.K.

The one that you're probably learning as you're learning to pronounce English words is RP. "RP" stands for "Received Pronunciation". It's a slightly strange term. "Received" where do you receive it from? Well, maybe you receive it from your teacher. This is how to say this word. It's a slightly strange expression, but RP, it's usually referred to by the initials. And it's the kind of accent you will hear if you're watching BBC Television programs or listening to BBC Radio. Not everybody on the BBC speaks with an RP accent. The news readers tend to be RP speakers, but not always. But the strange thing is that in this country, only a very small percentage of people do speak with this accent. Apparently, just 3%, but they tend to be people in positions of power, authority, responsibility. They probably earn a lot of money. They live in big houses. You know the idea. So, people like the Prime Minster, at the moment David Cameron, he went to a private school, he went to university, Oxford, so people who have been to Oxford and Cambridge Universities often speak in RP, even if they didn't speak in RP before they went to Oxford or Cambridge, they often change their accent while they are there because of the big influence of their surroundings and the people that they're meeting. So that's RP. It's a very clear accent. So, it's probably a good idea to either learn to speak English with an RP accent, or you may be learning with an American accent, a Canadian accent, all of those accents are very clear. Okay. And being clear is the most important thing.

Okay, so moving on. RP, as I should have said, is mostly in the south of the country; London and the south. So, also "Cockney" and "Estuary English" are in the south. Okay. So, Cockney is the local London accent, and it tends to spread further out to places like Kent, Essex, other places like that. Surrey. There's a newer version of Cockney called "Estuary English". If you think an estuary is connected to a river, so the River Thames which flows across the country, goes quite a long way west. So anyone living along the estuary, near the river can possibly have this accent as well.

So, just to give you some examples, then, of the Cockney accent, there are different features. So, one example is the "th" sound, as you know to make a "th" sound, some of you may find it difficult anyway, "the", when you put your tongue through your teeth, "the", but a Cockney person may not use the "the", they will use an "f" sound or a "v" sound instead, so the word "think", "I think", they would say would say instead of: "think", they would say it like that: "fink", "fink", and the top teeth are on the bottom lip, "think". And words like "with" that end with the "th", instead of "with", it will be "wiv", "wiv", "wiv". "Are you coming wiv me?" So that is one of the things that happens with the Cockney accent.

Words like "together" would be "togever". Okay? The number "three", t-h-r-e-e is often pronounced "free": "We have free people coming to dinner. Free people." So, there can be confusion there, because we have the word "free", which has a meaning in itself, "free", but if you actually mean "three", the number three, there can be some confusion. So don't get confused by "free people". -"Oh, they're free? They're free to come?" -"No, there are three of them. Three people who are free to come." Ah, okay.

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English Grammar: Negative contractions of the verb

English Grammar: Negative contractions of the verb "TO BE"

Learn ALL the negative contractions (isn't, aren't, wasn't, won't, and more) of the verb TO BE, in the present, past, and future tenses. This is basic English, so learn it right the first time, or review these if you're at a more advanced level -- many English students make mistakes with these! I'll even show you a non-standard, ungrammatical form, so that you'll recognise it when you hear it, though my advice is to avoid using it yourself! If you aren't sure what this lesson is about, I'm not joking -- all you need to do is click and all will be revealed! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-to-be-negative-contractions/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today's lesson is on negative contractions or abbreviations, so this is something you will hear a lot when people speak because people use these abbreviations or contractions all the time, in informal speech especially because it's quicker. Okay? So we're looking at some contractions using the negative because the way it's constructed is a bit different from the way it's done with the positive statement. Okay, so negative contractions, verb "to be". So, let's have a look first of all at the present tense. So, the positive would be: "I am", but the negative is: "I am not", but in the contracted form people say all the time when they're speaking: "I'm not. I'm not." And when it's written down you have an apostrophe which shows that there's something missing. So the letter "a" is missing here for "I am", so: "I'm not." Okay? Then... That's the first-person singular. So then second-person singular, "you": "You're not" because "am" changes to "are", "a-r-e", so: "You are not" contracted becomes "You're not" with an apostrophe, but then with all of these after the first person, all the other ones have an alternative version. So, you can either say: "You're not" or "You aren't", "You are", and instead of "not" spelt out, you've got "n't", so there are two different ways of saying it, either: "You're not" or "You aren't", and there isn't really much difference between them in terms of which is... They're both similar, they're both informal spoken. There isn't one that sounds more old-fashioned than the other. They're just alternatives. So: "You're not" or "You aren't". You may have heard people using this form and perhaps being confused by it, or you may be used to one form and not the other one, so this is giving you both here. So: "You're not" or "You aren't". Okay, then the third-person singular, so it's: "he", "she", "it", third-person singular. So it's either: "He's not" for "He is not", "He's not", or "She's not", or "It's not"; or it can be: "He isn't", and again, it's the "not" part that gets the apostrophe rather than the "is" part. "He's not" or "He isn't"; "She's not", "She isn't"; "It's not", "It isn't". Okay. And then moving on to the plural, first-person plural, "we", so: "We are not" becomes "We're not", "We are not". You may also be not quite sure how to pronounce these when they're contracted, so I hope this lesson helps you with that as well. Some people get a bit confused about how to say it, so: "We are not", "We're not", or: "We aren't", "We aren't". Okay? And then "you" will be the same again here in the plural, the second-person plural is just the same: "You", "You're not", "You aren't". And then we have the third-person plural for "they": "They are not" becomes "They're not", "They're not", or: "They aren't", "They aren't". Okay? So, I hope that's helpful, there. And then there's a funny thing that happens, there's a non-standard version of this which you might hear in the UK, especially in the London area, but I think it's also used in other parts of the country, too. And it's a non-standard, which some people call bad grammar, but to be more polite, it's called non-standard. It's not the standard grammar, and it's this "ain't", and again an "'t" shows that it's not, but "a", "not", nobody says: "a not", but in the contracted form it's pronounced: "ain't" and it can be used for all the pronouns, which is quite useful really that it doesn't change. It may be non-standard, but at least it doesn't change so it's easy, although I wouldn't advise you to use it because it sounds very casual, very informal. So you would say: "I ain't", "I ain't", "You ain't", "He ain't", "She ain't", "It ain't", "We ain't", "They ain't", so meaning: "I ain't going to the cinema", "We ain't going tonight", "He ain't working today", things like that. So, "ain't" you will hear probably people saying it, especially if you're in the UK; you might hear it on television, on the radio, in films, and so on. Okay? And then back to the standard grammar again now, going to the past tense, so: "Was not" becomes "Wasn't", "Wasn't", and "Were not" becomes "Weren't", "Weren't". So: "was" and "were" depending on which person. So: "I wasn't", "You weren't", "He/She/It wasn't", "We weren't", "They weren't".

2 лет назад
Accents - BRITISH vs AMERICAN: English Accents Around the World

Accents - BRITISH vs AMERICAN: English Accents Around the World

Accents - BRITISH vs AMERICAN. Here is the other video we shot for Gabby's channel. Enjoy! Hilarious Differences in Dialect - https://youtu.be/qWp0qTJH6OE During this lesson we will discover some of the differences between a British English accent and a general American accent. Thank you to Gabby from Go Natural English for helping me with this video. For more accent videos see the links below. Anna's Pronunciation Course: www.britishenglishpro.com FREE AUDIOBOOKS TRIAL (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED) - http://amzn.to/2lPS05r ====== 🙏CONTRIBUTE🙏 ====== 🙏 TRANSLATE MY VIDEOS: https://goo.gl/qBZs1O 🏆 JOIN OUR PATRON TEAM: https://www.patreon.com/AnnaTyrie Credit to every member of my Patreon team, with special thanks to: Ewa, Benjamin, Paolo, Vincenzo and Ibolya ======= RELATED VIDEOS ======= BRITISH ACCENTS PLAYLIST: https://goo.gl/pf3zkt 250 MOST COMMON WORDS - https://youtu.be/WgPgiTYW_tU PREPOSITIONS ON, AT, IN - https://youtu.be/XrAOFVofeLM FRUIT IDIOMS - https://youtu.be/6OovqtTcZO4 PRONUNCIATION - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_Zjf61X10RKpPve7Op8CF_8T0OpCzsb- ====== My Links ======= MY WHATSAPP GROUP https://youtu.be/nlMHjq0LOHg PRONUNCIATION COURSE www.britishenglishpro.com SOCIAL PLATFORM www.englishlikeanative.me OTHER YOUTUBE CHANNELS www.youtube.com/user/verbalessons www.youtube.com/user/annatyrie www.youtube.com/c/BellaBeansTV MY SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS www.facebook.com/BritishEnglishLikeaNative www.instagram.com/britishenglishpro ======= ENGLISH PRODUCTS ====== ☕ UNION JACK MUG: http://amzn.to/2o39FdV 🇬🇧 Grammar Exercises: BEGINNERS: http://amzn.to/2qxfSjN 🇬🇧 Grammar : INTERMEDIATE: http://amzn.to/2sbAdbk 🇬🇧 Grammar: ADVANCED: http://amzn.to/2qDtDZo 🤓 IELTS Complete Study Guide: http://amzn.to/2sbHHuY ======== FREE TRIALS ========= (If you haven't already, then I recommend taking advantage of the following free trials to aid your English learning) FREE MUSIC - www.amazon.co.uk/music/unlimited?&tag=e0069-21 FREE MOVIES - www.amazon.co.uk/tryprimefree?tag=e0069-21 FREE AUDIOBOOKS - http://amzn.to/2lPS05r ======== TRAVEL CREDIT ======== BUS: $5 Credit: http://ssqt.co/mLcg84C HOTEL: $35 Credit: www.airbnb.co.uk/c/annat30863 RENT A CAR: $25 Credit https://goo.gl/2VJpwt GEAR: $10 Credit towards your first purchase of $50 or more: http://www.theclymb.com/invite/AnnaTyrie ============================== Thanks for Watching - Please SUBSCRIBE! Anna ❤ 🇬🇧 BUSINESS ENQUIRIES ONLY: englishlikeanative@gmail.com

1 лет назад
Improve Your Vocabulary: 23 words for talking about feeling good or bad

Improve Your Vocabulary: 23 words for talking about feeling good or bad

How many words do you know that mean 'happy'? What about 'sad'? In today's lesson you'll learn LOTS of different ways to describe how you're feeling. When you're learning a language, it's important to have a broad vocabulary. Whether you're writing an essay or you're speaking with your boss, using more interesting and expressive vocabulary will make your sentences clearer, and you'll sound more intelligent, too. Try using the adjectives in this lesson instead of ordinary ones at work, school, or in the writing and speaking sections of exams like the IELTS, TOEFL, or CAE. You'll also learn some common expressions and idioms that native speakers use to talk about their mood, like "over the moon", "happy bunny", and "down in the dumps". Test your knowledge with the quiz: http://www.engvid.com/improve-your-vocabulary-23-words-for-talking-about-feeling-good-or-bad/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from www.engvid.com, and today, in this lesson we're going to be looking at some vocabulary for moods, emotions, and feelings, which are all the same thing, really. So, there you are, you've learnt three words that all mean the same thing; "mood", "emotion", "feeling". They're all pretty much the same meaning. Okay? And we're looking at positive words for good... Good emotions, and some negative words for not so happy emotions. Okay. Right, so let's have a look. Most people are going to use "happy" and "sad", those are probably the first words you learn when you want to describe emotions, but sometimes I hear people talking and having a conversation, and they just keep using the same "happy", "sad", and there's no variation. I mean, it's okay, but to have a broader vocabulary is good, especially if you're going to be using it in the IELTS, for example, in the speaking test, or in some essay writing, or any... Any exams you're doing, whether they're written or spoken. It's good to have a wider range of vocabulary. So, I've got some for you, here. So, look no further. Right. So, "happy" and "glad". You may have heard "glad". "Oh, I'm so glad." If your friend tells you that they've just got a new job and they're really enjoying it, you can say: "Oh, I'm so glad to hear that." Or "pleased" is very similar. "I'm really pleased for you.", "Very pleased", "Very glad". Okay? So those are all, "happy", "glad", "pleased", they're all pretty much the same sort of meaning, sort of generally; positive and happy. Then we come to some words that are a little bit more intense; they're stronger. Stronger words. "Delighted". If your friend has this new job, and you say: "Oh, I'm delighted." That's three syllables for one thing, so that makes it "delighted", that makes it more stronger. But also, it's a nice word to know. Also, if you get an invitation to a party, and you say: "Oh, I'd be delighted to come. Thank you." Or an invitation anywhere. "Oh, delighted." Unless, of course, you want to play it cool and not be too, you know. Okay, so you can use "delighted" in writing and in speaking. Okay. The same with this word: "thrilled". There's the word "thrill", which is the noun. "What a thrill", and you can practice your: "th", "thra", "thra". It's difficult to say, because it's not just the "th", which is hard for some people, but there's an "r" as well, so it's: "thrilled", it's quite hard to say if you're not used to that kind of pronunciation. "Thrill" and "thrilled". "I'd be thrilled"-okay?-"to go to the party". And, here's another, this is a very sophisticated word: "elated". It's not the sort of word, perhaps, that you would use in a sort of informal, casual conversation. "Elated" is quite a high, high status kind of word, but it's a good one in certain contexts. Okay. And "elation", the noun, "elation", but it's not used in sort of everyday life. Okay, "ecstatic" is a little bit like "elated". You've probably heard of the noun "ecstasy", okay? Which, unfortunately, is also now linked with a drug, which is probably unfortunate, but there we are. But that's the drug "ecstasy" produces a result of feeling ecstasy. So, ecstatic, but please don't try it; not a good idea. So, "ecstatic", it's a very extreme, extreme kind of word again. Extreme. Okay? "Delirious" is another. Sometimes this is used in a medical sense by doctors. If someone is delirious, they may have a high temperature. If the doctor takes their temperature and it's way up, and maybe they've got a cold or a fever - delirious. You can be deliriously happy. That doesn't mean you have a temperature and a cold; it just means you're really, really, really happy. But, you can also be delirious with a fever, so it's that sort of extreme sense with that word. Okay? "In a good mood" is: "Oh, we're back down to earth again. It was getting a little bit too exciting." We're back down to earth. If you say you're in a good mood, that's sort of normal. It's like saying: "happy", "glad", "pleased", "in a good mood".

3 лет назад
London Accents: RP | Cockney | Multicultural London English

London Accents: RP | Cockney | Multicultural London English

Today I'm joined by Joel & Lia to teach you guys the three main London accents; Received Pronunciation (RP), Cockney and Multicultural London English (MLE). We give you a little bit of background about each accent and then we use example sentences to teach you the differences between them. Britain has many different accents so if you enjoyed this pronunciation lesson and you would like more let me know in the comments below. Please go and send love to Joel & Lia's channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/joelandlia BBC English Accent Tutorial - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSOh8FEr-1c Do you want to improve your listening? Sign up to Audible for a free 30 day trial - http://bit.ly/2AoARJ6 If you enjoyed this video please SHARE it with anyone you know studying English and of course hit the LIKE button. Stay connected with me on social media Website: http://www.eatsleepdreamenglish.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/eatsleepdreamenglish Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eatsleepdreamenglish Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/EatSleepDreamEnglish Camera: Canon G7X Editing Software: Final Cut Pro X Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com)

12 месяцев назад
One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

Siobhan Thompson performs a tour of the accents of the British Isles - and the celebrities who speak with them! Five lessons to help you do a better British accent here: http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2014/04/five-lessons-help-sort-british-accent/ Photos via AP Images. Follow Anglophenia on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Tumblr: http://anglophenia.tumblr.com Follow Siobhan Thompson on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/vornietom

5 лет назад
The British Royal Family: Everything you need to know

The British Royal Family: Everything you need to know

Interested in the UK and the British Royal Family? Don't know who all these dukes and duchesses are? In this lesson, I'll explain how the British monarchy works. You'll learn about the members and titles of the royal family, the history of monarchy in the UK, and how our constitutional monarchy works. I'll answer questions like: What is the queen's job? Why is there no king right now, even though Queen Elizabeth II has a husband? Who will inherit the throne?... and more. Watch this lesson to understand the royal family and the culture of monarchy in the UK. TAKE THIS QUIZ TO TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE: https://www.engvid.com/british-royal-family/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today's lesson is all about the British Royal Family. Okay, so if you probably see items in the news about our royal family, you'll have seen the queen, Queen Elizabeth; maybe her husband, Prince Philip; but they're a big family, and also not all countries have a royal family so I've just put this lesson together with a bit of information to tell you a little bit more about them. Okay, right, so the British Royal Family are also known as the House of Windsor, because Windsor is their name, which comes from Windsor. This place here, Windsor Castle is one of their homes. So years ago they decided to use the name Windsor. So, some people like the royal family, admire them. They think of them as kind of celebrities, just like film stars, and sports celebrities. They're reported in the newspapers in a similar way. You get gossip about them. In some newspapers who like to write a lot of gossip, if they've heard something, it may not be accurate, but they've heard a story about some member of the royal family, and they print the story. They might have a photograph to go with it. So they're always in the news, the royal family, for one reason or another, either a good reason or a bad reason. Pretty much every day you can hear something about the royal family or read something in the newspaper. So, some people do like them, and even, you know, think of them as celebrities, and maybe give too much time and thought to them. But then at the other extreme, some people dislike them because they're thinking of the fact that they spend a lot of money, they have all these buildings which are expensive to look after, people say: "What work do they do?" They don't seem to do any work, so why should they live such rich lives if they don't do anything? But, of course, a lot of the royal family do things all the time. They're not working for money always, sometimes they do that as well, they have jobs some of them with a salary, but some of them, they may not be working and being paid for it, but they're doing kind of diplomatic work, they're meeting visitors from other countries, they're being kind of ambassadors, that sort of thing. So they keep busy, and they're patrons of charities and they go to events, and they give their support to things and so on. So, a lot of the royal family do keep quite busy trying to live useful lives, and so I think if they didn't do that there would be a lot more sort of criticism of them. But because you can't see that they're doing things, working hard, that stops a lot of people from criticizing and saying we shouldn't have a royal family. Some people are called Republicans, and they say we should have a president instead of a queen or a king. We should have a president and a prime minister instead of a queen and a prime minister. So there are Republicans around and have been for more than a hundred years, people who wanted to get rid of the royal family, but it hasn't happened yet. Okay, so the kind of system we have in the UK, it's called a constitutional monarchy. The "monarchy" part is to do with the royal family, with the queen. The monarch, so the word "monarch" means king or queen. The "constitutional" part is to do with politics, and the government, and parliament. So what happens, really, is the government, the MPs, the ministers in parliament, they make the decisions. The government makes the decisions. And if they have a new piece of, an act of parliament, a new law, for example, the queen just has to sign it. If it's been democratically decided already by the politicians that this will become law, the queen can't just say: "No, I don't like that. I'm not going to sign it." She just has to sign it because it's gone through a democratic process. So that's why it's a constitutional monarchy. It's the monarch or king or queen governed by the parliament, by the politicians. Okay. So, let's have a look at some of the vocabulary which is fairly simple most of it. So a king or queen is the monarch, the head of state if you like. Usually any children they have will be prince or princess, so prince for male, princess of female. There are some other titles used as well, which are sort of high aristocratic titles. Duke for the male, duchess for the female.

1 лет назад
Polite British Expressions | How to Speak English Politely

Polite British Expressions | How to Speak English Politely

Polite British English expressions are essential if you want to avoid the common language mistakes that could make you sound a little rude. More than 'please and 'thank you' these phrases will help you order your Sartbucks coffee, give instructions or even disagree with your boss! Learn to sound more polite with this simple but essential English Language lesson! Follow us on social media. https://www.facebook.com/LoveEnglishwithLeilaandSabrah/ https://twitter.com/loveenglishuk?lang=en https://www.instagram.com/loveenglish.uk/

5 месяцев назад
TEST YOUR ENGLISH! Irregular Past Participles

TEST YOUR ENGLISH! Irregular Past Participles

Do we say "I have catched a cold" or, "I have caught a cold"? From present simple to present perfect, how do you know which past participle to use? Wait a minute. Use a PAST participle with the present perfect? Yes! In fact, there are two types of irregular past participles, and in this lesson, I will teach you when to use them. Be sure to complete the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/irregular-past-participles/ to confirm your understanding. Study and download a list of the most common irregular verbs in English here: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/common-irregular-verbs-grouped/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is on irregular past tenses. Okay? And in particular: "Irregular Past Participles"-okay?-of irregular verbs. So, let me just show you some examples to make it clearer what I mean. Okay. So what we're doing, we're looking at three different tenses to show how the verb changes, so the present simple of the verb, then the past simple, and then when we use the present perfect that's when you have to use the past participle. And what happens is sometimes it's the same for both the past simple and the present perfect, but with other verbs it's different. So I just have two examples here to show you, one verb where it's the same and one verb where it's different just to illustrate. And then in the second part of the lesson we will have a list of two separate sets of verbs, and I will test you on your knowledge of the past participles of those and they're listed under "same" and "different" just to clarify which ones stay the same, which ones are different. Okay. So let's have a look at some examples, and then it should all become clearer. So, first of all, this is the present simple: "I catch a cold every winter." Every winter, achoo, I'm sneezing. Oh, terrible, every winter I catch a cold. So for something that happens regularly, that is one way that we use the present simple when something happens regularly. Every, every winter I catch a cold, so the verb is "to catch", okay? So then if we put it into the past tense, the past simple and we say: "Last month... I caught a cold last month." Okay? So: "caught" is the irregular past simple form of the verb "to catch". "I caught a cold last month." I caught a cold last month, but I'm much better now. That sort of idea. Okay. So then the third example here is using the present perfect which involves using this word: "have" as an auxiliary, as an extra verb. So: "I have caught another cold!" Oh dear, I only had a cold... I caught a cold last month, and now I have caught another cold. That's one cold after another. So this is in the more recent past, the present perfect using "have": "I have caught another cold." Meaning just recently. So you can see here that "caught" stays the same, it's the same. So it's an example where the past simple and the present perfect stay the same, but let's have a look now at an example where there's a change and where they're different. Okay? So, back to the present simple again and the verb is "to write", which is an irregular verb, so: "I write to my cousin once a year." I have a cousin who is not on email, and it makes it rather inconvenient to keep in touch with her, so writing letters and putting them in the post I find a terrible job these days. I'm so used to using email for everybody, but I have a cousin who's not on email and she will not have a computer. So I have to write a letter to her. "I write to my cousin once a year." Okay? So, again, that's using the present simple for a regular action. Once a year is the regular action, I write. Okay, so then if we move to the past simple: "Last week... I wrote to my cousin last week." So that's the past simple. So, the form there for the past simple is "wrote", from "write" to "wrote", but then if we use the present perfect using the auxiliary "have": "Today... I have written to my cousin today." So recent past, it's a completed action. "I have written". Thank goodness I've got that letter written and posted, and it's gone now, so that's a job done for the year. So: "I have written", so you can see there that this form is not the same. They're the same here: "I caught", "I have caught", but with "write": "I wrote", "I have written to my cousin today." So you can see how past simple and present perfect with different verbs, sometimes they stay the same, other times they're different. Okay. So let's move on to the second part of the lesson, and we'll have a look at two lists of verbs, and I will test you on your knowledge of the past participles. Okay, so let's have a look at these which are the verbs which stay the same in the past simple and the present perfect, and I will just write that form in, but just to give you an opportunity first to think what it is. So: "to send", I send in the present.

2 лет назад
Advanced British Pronunciation - Speak like a native in 5 sounds

Advanced British Pronunciation - Speak like a native in 5 sounds

Join us for intensive British pronunciation training. Learn the 5 sounds of British pronunciation that you'll need in order to sound like a native British English speaker! __________________________________________ Improve your English AND Support the channel: Get EXTRA English practice by joining this channel as a member! https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwk6ifONlkvqnoMF2uyA05g/join OR Get EXTRA English practice by joining my Patreon page: www.patreon.com/papateachme OR Make a donation for however much you feel comfortable with: http://bit.ly/DonateToPapateachme Improve your English! - Audiobooks for a 30 day trial: https://amzn.to/2DH4arI FREE STUFF!!! FREE $32 AirBnB Credit: www.airbnb.com/c/awilliams803 FREE First Uber ride invite code: kzik3 Follow me on Social Media: Instagram: @papateachme Twitter: @papateachme Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/papateachme Support the lessons on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/papateachme Business inquiries: alytheteacher@gmail.com I use these for my videos: Camera https://amzn.to/2MCnTf6 Lens https://amzn.to/2WeprjP / https://amzn.to/2DH3qTs Microphone https://amzn.to/2RpNA38 Light https://amzn.to/2TiwJB2 My favourite books (By Level) ---Advanced--- Transmigration of Bodies: https://amzn.to/2Ros7I3 Fight Club: https://amzn.to/2RnYoPh ---Upper Intermediate / Advanced--- Fear and loathing: https://amzn.to/2CS0JNa American Psycho: https://amzn.to/2DJyu57 ---Intermediate / Upper Intermediate--- Scar Tissue – Anthony Keidis: https://amzn.to/2UsjuxX ---Elementary / Pre-Intermediate--- Harry Potter: https://amzn.to/2DI186A ---For kids--- Green Eggs and Ham: https://amzn.to/2DFTM3h

3 лет назад
Learn Basic English Vocabulary: FAMILY

Learn Basic English Vocabulary: FAMILY

A family may be big or small, but it is important to learn everyone's title so you can understand how they are related to one another. From granddaughter to father-in-law, there are many words to learn and master. In this lesson, I will give you all the main vocabulary you need to identify all the members of a family. I will also teach you the difference between some formal and informal terms. You will get a chance to practise in the quiz at the end of the video at https://www.engvid.com/learn-basic-english-vocabulary-family/ How many titles can you remember? TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and we have a lesson today on vocabulary connected with the family; so all the names, the family relationships, and the standard names, and also some informal names that are used within a family for different family members. Okay. So, let's have a look. So, first of all: "mother", a very important person. So: "mother" is the standard name for mother, but within the family, she might be called: "mum", or "mummy", or "mom". "Mom" is a more American type of way of saying: "mum". We say in the U.K.: "mum", but America... In America it's usually "mom", so... And this one... This is a bit old-fashioned: "mamma". So, if you're watching an old film that's set in the maybe 19th century, something like that, the mother might be called "mamma", which was a bit more formal in those days. In the 19th century, in this country, anyway, children and parents were more formal in the way they spoke to each other than they are now. So, that's "mamma". And, also: "mater", this is a funny one. This comes from the Latin word for "mother": "mater". Although, if you're studying Latin, you might pronounce it: "mahter", rather than: "mater", but this was a slightly jokey name that mostly boys who went to private schools, where they studied Latin, and they were... They were living... They were residential schools, so when they came home to visit their parents, they would call their mother "mater" and their father "pater". That's "pater", there; the Latin names for mother and father. I think it was a little bit jokey, and they're not really used so much now. Okay, so let's move on. "Father" is the standard word for "father", but he could be called: "dad", or "daddy", "pop". Don't ask me why: How can it change to "Pop"? Don't know. "Pop", "pops"; then "papa" is the equivalent of "mama", so those... Again, that's old-fashioned, 19th century; very formal: "mama", "mama", "papa". And "pater", the Latin version of it. Okay. So then we have: "brother", if you have a brother, they could be called in a very informal way: "bro". Not many people use this, but some people do. "Bro". So, the first three letters of "brother": "bro". Or: "bruv". "Brother", but "bruv", like a "v". That comes from the sort of London accent; the Cockney London accent where Cockneys, instead of pronouncing "th": "brother", they make a "v" sound instead: "bruver", "bruver". So, that comes from that. "Bruv", "bruv". Okay, and then a female... These are called "siblings", by the way. Siblings. If you have brothers and sisters, they are called siblings. So, a "sister", "sister" is the standard word; it can be shortened to "sis" in an informal way. Okay. And then you have "uncle" who could be the brother of your father or the brother of your mother. It's the same word for both; there's no difference. Maybe in some languages you have different words for that, but "uncle" is the brother of either your mother or your father. And there's no... As far as I know, there's no short, informal version of "uncle". But with "aunt", which is the female version-so the sister of your mother or the sister of your father-there is - there's: "auntie", so you just add "ie" at the end. "Auntie". And just to mention, that in India, these words: "uncle" and "aunt", or "auntie" are used as a term of respect. So, we don't do that in the U.K.; we only use these for the actual family relative. We don't... You know, if there's an older person, we wouldn't automatically call them "auntie" or "uncle". We might say... I don't know what you'd say. "Sir" or "madam", or something, if you're being very formal; but not "uncle" or "auntie". Okay. That's in India. Maybe in some other countries as well; I don't know. Please put in the comments if you know a bit more about that. Okay, so then: "nephew" and "niece" are the next pair. This is the male version and the female version. So, a "nephew" is the son of your brother or sister. Okay. So, if you have a brother or sister who has had some children, the brother's son or the sister's... Your brother's son or your sister's son is your nephew. Okay? And there's no... As far as I know, there's no informal word for that. And then the "niece" is the female version, so your brother's daughter or your sister's daughter is your niece. Okay? So: "nephew" and "niece"; male, female. […]

9 месяцев назад
How To Sound BRITISH **6 tips**

How To Sound BRITISH **6 tips**

Things British People Say: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=StsZVqJo8S0 USA vs UK English: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IMitmSFApXA How to sound British - learn to speak in a British accent and style using these six tips to sound more British. It's easy when you know how. Some tips are based on the words you use, some on how you pronounce those words and the rest are a mixture of both. Hope you enjoyed this video and found it useful if you did let me know - leave a comment and click like! Usually I teach Arabic on YouTube but this is something a bit different. ================================================== Book me on CAMEO! I’ll make a short video dedicated to you saying anything you want! ▶ https://www.cameo.com/arabicmike Learn ANY language online with a native speaker: ▶ http://go.italki.com/stepbysteparabic Join me on PATREON for NEW videos EARLY + contact me directly to answer your questions: ▶ https://www.patreon.com/arabicmike ================================================== Do you speak other languages? Would you like to add translated subtitles to one of my videos and get your name credited in the description? Your translations are greatly appreciated! Click HERE ▶ http://bit.ly/2HgkUVl ================================================== I’m Mike from England and my videos mostly teach Arabic and English. I also do the occasional Arabic music video and travel video from somewhere cool I’ve been. Welcome to my channel. 🔴 ARABIC LESSONS: http://bit.ly/2exLxgd 🔴 ENGLISH LESSONS: http://bit.ly/2lX8qJT 🔴 SINGING ARABIC SONGS: http://bit.ly/2vAmRe3 🔴 TRAVEL VIDEOS: http://bit.ly/2vT7Krm SUBSCRIBE for weekly videos! ▶ http://bit.ly/2LJe1hT Add me on these things ↴ ☉ INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/arabic.mike ☉ SNAPCHAT: https://www.snapchat.com/add/arabic.mike ☉ TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheArabicMike ☉ FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ArabicMike ================================================== LINKS TO REFERENCED CLIPS: I Swear English https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLcCwcMa0qM Henry’s British English https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zj8J-j4r2VM& Things British people say https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNgtokCPcJ0 Keira Knightley Interview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWerw7WfVaM Ed Sheeran Song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNumeY1XcRs The Saturdays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lEUHD1vOn4 Damien Rice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWqmuaZGANM Matthew P https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQze-wjcGVA& Jurassic 5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeN9c2GYJkk

10 месяцев назад
Learn 10 English PHRASAL VERBS with

Learn 10 English PHRASAL VERBS with "UP": dress up, wash up, grow up...

Here in the U.K., we love using phrasal verbs! If you want to speak with us and understand us, you've got to learn these English expressions. In this lesson, you'll learn 10 phrasal verbs with the preposition 'up' in them. I'll explain the meaning of each phrasal verb and give you examples of their common usage. You'll learn 'dress up', 'drink up', 'wash up', 'look up', 'speak up', 'read up', 'grow up', 'mess up', 'cook up', and 'make up'. After the lesson, you can take the quiz on EngVid, where you can also watch many other free lessons on phrasal verbs. http://www.engvid.com/learn-10-english-phrasal-verbs-with-up/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. This is Gill at www.engvid.com, and in today's lesson we're going to be looking at some phrasal verbs using the preposition "up". So, a phrasal verb, just to remind you, is the verb plus the preposition. So, in this case, the preposition in all of these examples is "up", so it's being put with a main verb to turn it into a phrasal verb. Okay? So let's have a look at what we have here. So, first of all: "Children love to dress up." Okay? Children like to put clothes on, maybe their mother's clothes, put makeup on, ear rings, all sorts of things to dress up. So, that's the phrasal verb. "To dress up" is to put sort of special clothes on for, you know, just for fun really. Adults dress up as well if they're going somewhere special. "Oh, we'll have to dress up for this party", put some jewellery on and a long full-length's dress or a tuxedo with a bowtie, all that sort of thing. Dressing up in special clothes for a special occasion. Okay? Dressing up. Second one: "It's time to drink up - the bar is closing." So, "to drink up" is to finish your drink. Drink up, you're putting the glass up like that to finish your drink because the bar is closing and you have to go, so you don't want to leave your drink there. You want to drink it because you paid for it, so you don't want to waste it. Okay. "Time to drink up". Right, now, this is a common complaint that somebody in the household: "He never washes up." And we have the noun from this: "the washing up", which is about washing the dishes after a meal. "He never washes up.", "To wash up" means washing all the dishes after a meal. Okay. Now, next one, if there's a word you don't know: "I don't know that word - I'll have to look it up." So the phrasal verb is "to look up". But you'll notice that the pronoun "it" has to go in the middle there. You don't... You can't say: "I have to look up it." You have to put the pronoun in the middle: "I have to look it up." Okay. Right, so and "looking it up", that means getting the dictionary or using a computer, looking for the word to find the meaning. "Looking it up" means find the page, look down the page: "Ah, there it is. What does it mean? Ah, okay." Looking up, referring to a book or referring to a website to find out the definition. Okay, next one: "I can't hear you - please speak up." Okay? "Speak up" means get louder, say it louder. "I can't hear you. Please speak up. Turn up the volume." Okay? "Speak up". Okay, next one, you're studying and you say: "I'm having to read up on Shakespeare for the test next week." So, if you "read up" on a subject that means you're reading lots of information about the subject. You're finding books, you're finding websites, all sorts of sources to get lots of information, learning all the information, get it into your head for a test, for the test next week. "Reading up" means to gather information about a subject. Okay. Right. Now, this next one is not a very nice thing to say to somebody, especially if they're maybe over 40: "When are you going to grow up?" Okay? It's okay... If you say it to a child, that doesn't really make sense because a child hasn't grown up yet. But people tend to say this to adults because if an adult is behaving in a very silly way like a child, a childish way, somebody might say to them: "When are you going to grow up?" Meaning become mature. "Grow up" can mean to get taller, but it also means to become more sensible, more mature, you know, be a more responsible adult person. Okay. Rather than messing about and being silly. All right. Okay, next one: "You've really messed that up." So, mess... "To mess up", if you mess up... And again, you'll see another word comes in between, but this is the phrasal verb: "to mess up". "To mess something up" is to do something badly. Just a mess is untidy, not very good. If you mess something up, you've made a very bad job of it. You've not done it at all well. You've done it very badly. Okay. Next one: "What are you cooking up now?" So, "to cook up", you might think this is some food that you're cooking in the kitchen, but in this sense it's more metaphorical. If you cook something up, you're planning something.

2 лет назад
10 Grammar Errors that Drive British People CRAZY | British English Grammar Lesson #Spon

10 Grammar Errors that Drive British People CRAZY | British English Grammar Lesson #Spon

Learn about the top 10 grammar mistakes that make the British crazy! British natives hate it when people (especially other natives) make these errors! ITALKI OFFER: Buy 1 lesson, get $10 free credits at italki: http://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy Thank you to italki for sponsoring this video. Love, Lucy xoxo MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH Apply DISCOUNT coupons and codes automatically: https://joinhoney.com/ref/7wypw61(I love this, it's the best invention ever! Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_p... My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a #Spon in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.

10 месяцев назад
Real English: Speaking on the phone

Real English: Speaking on the phone

Are you afraid to answer the phone or make calls in English? This is very common among English learners because it is more difficult to understand a new language over the phone than face-to-face. In this lesson, I will cover all the different situations and problems that come up during phone calls, and show you how to solve them easily. I will also give you useful expressions you can use over the phone to make the call go more smoothly. Don't forget to do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/real-english-speaking-on-the-phone/ to practice your phone conversation skills! TRANSCRIPT Well... Oo, actually I've got to go now because you know I'm at work. Yeah. I've just got to teach a lesson. Okay. Yeah, I'm teaching a lesson right now. Uh-huh. Okay, so I'll see ya later. Yeah? All right. See ya later, then. Bye. Bye. Sorry about that. Hi. Oo. Pen. Hi. I'm Gill from engVid, and today-sorry-we have a lesson on the phone. Not on the phone. I was just on the phone. I apologize about that. Unexpected phone call. We're looking today at: "Phone Vocabulary". Okay? So words and phrases to use to do with making phone calls, being on the phone, calling people. Okay. Maybe just with your friends, phoning your friends, but also in your job if you have to use the phone at work - this is all useful stuff for that. Okay. Right. So, phone vocabulary. First of all, if the phone rings you "answer the phone". Okay? Answer the phone. You say: "Oh, the phone is ringing. I'll have to answer the phone." Okay. Now, if you're making the call, you're phoning, you're making... Making a phone call. Okay? And somebody answers at the other end, you have to say something. So you might say: "Hello, is that Anne? Is that Anne?" So: "Hello, is that", and the name of the person that you want to speak to. That's more maybe informal if you're phoning somebody's home. If you're phoning an office, a business, you might say: "Hello. Could I speak to...?" This is a little bit more... More formal. "Could I speak to Mr. Jones?" Something like that. Okay. Sometimes when you make a phone call and somebody answers, and you're not quite sure if it's the person you want or not, you don't quite recognize the voice, so you sometimes want to ask them their name to see if that is the person you were phoning to speak to. So you can say: "Who am I speaking to, please?" It's always a good idea to use "please" when you're asking a question on the phone. "Who am I speaking to, please?" And then they will say who they are and if they are the person you want to speak to, you can continue with your call; if they are not the person you want to speak to, you would use this: "Could I speak to Mr. Jones, please?" Okay, right. Now, sometimes if you phone and the person at the other end, they want you to wait probably because they need to find the person you want to speak to, so they say: "Could you hang on?" or "Could you hold on?" That's the same thing. It just means to wait. "Hang on" or "Hold on". Or if they're being very polite or if this is you in an office taking a phone call, and it might be a customer, an important person, so you might say very politely: "Would you mind holding?" Instead of just saying: "Hang on", which is a little bit casual and informal, or even: "Hold on" which is a little... Not very... It's okay, but it's not very polite. This is much more polite: "Would you mind holding?" It's a much nicer way. "Would you mind holding, please?" is even better. Okay, so that's a good one to use. And then say this is you going to try to find somebody in the office to take this phone call, you come back. If you have to go back to the same person after they've been holding on or hanging on, or holding, you come and say: "Sorry to keep you waiting. Sorry to keep you waiting." Especially if they're a customer. And, again: "Sorry", if there is other bad news like the person they want to speak to is not there: "Sorry, she's not here." You might say: "She's not here at the moment." At the moment. Or if that person is already on the phone talking to somebody else, you can say: "Sorry, he's on the other line", meaning the telephone line. "Sorry, he's on the other line." So, when that situation happens and say it's you in an office taking the call, you don't want to just say: "Oh, sorry, he's on the other line" and then wait for the person to say something, like: "Oh well, okay then, good bye." You have to be helpful. You've got to then continue being helpful because this could be a customer or it could be the boss, it could be anybody. So you need to be helpful and say: "Sorry, he's on the other line. Can I take a message?" Okay? Take a message, to write down a message to say this person called, and either they will call again or can you call them back. So: "Can I take a message?" or "Can I give her a message?" Okay? And if it's you that's calling, you have phoned somewhere and the person is not available-okay?-you can say, politely: "Could I leave a message?" Okay?

2 лет назад
Learn Negative Prefixes in English: IN-, IM-, IL-, IR-, IG-

Learn Negative Prefixes in English: IN-, IM-, IL-, IR-, IG-

Did you know that you can transform a positive word into a negative one simply by adding a prefix to it? A prefix is a syllable you add before a word to change its meaning. For example, you can change “possible” into its opposite by adding the prefix “im-”, to make “impossible”. In this lesson, I’ll help you improve your vocabulary by teaching you FIVE negative prefixes, all beginning with “i”. Test your understanding of the lesson by taking the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/negative-prefixes-in-english-i/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. This is Gill here at engVid, and today we have a lesson on... Well, how to increase your vocabulary just by adding a little bit at the beginning of a word to make it negative, so that's called a negative prefix. So, for example, this is probably one word you will know: the word "correct", when you get something right; "correct". If you say "incorrect", then that's the negative, meaning not correct. So, you can automatically add a word to your vocabulary just by adding the negative bit at the beginning. Okay? So, we're looking today at different what are called prefixes because you put it in front of the word. In English, there are 12 of these prefixes, so we're going to look at them in two different lessons. In this lesson, we're looking at five of them; and then in the other lesson, we'll look at seven. So, does that add up to...? Seven, eight - yes, that adds up to 12. Good. So, the reason we have five here and seven in the other one: All of these begin with the letter "i", so we've put these all together, but the other seven are different; they're all different. So, let's have a look at these. So, increase your vocabulary by using a negative prefix. So, the first prefix, which is used for a lot of words... You have to know which is the right one to use; you can't just use any negative prefix with any word. They belong with certain words. So, the ones that belong with "in", here are some examples; there are lots more. So, if something is complete, it's complete, everything is there; but if it's incomplete... If your... If your homework is incomplete, it means you haven't finished it. So: "Is your homework complete, or is it incomplete? Do you still need to do some more work on it?" So, that's "incomplete" - the negative. Okay? So... And then when you get your homework back, is it all correct? Did you get full marks, or was there anything in it that was incorrect? If you got something incorrect, you maybe lost a mark or two. Okay. So, "incorrect". If you're efficient, you do things very efficiently; very well, very... You have a good method for doing things - but if you're inefficient or if somebody is inefficient, it means they're not very well-organized; they don't do things in a very logical way. It takes them longer to do it, they might make mistakes, and so on. So, that's "inefficient". Okay. "Formal". We sometimes talk about formal language, and then the opposite of that is "informal", informal language is when you're having a conversation with a friend, you might be using slang terms and so on. But if you're meeting somebody important or you're going for a job interview, you will be fairly formal. So, you're either formal or informal, depending on who you're with. Okay. And who you're talking to. So, "informal". Human, we're all human, but sometimes if people do something bad, it's called "inhuman". If someone does something really bad to somebody else, they're being inhuman; they're not thinking of that person's feelings. They're hurting them in some way. So you could say: "That was inhuman, what he did." Maybe to give... You know, to get... If someone leaves a job, they're given the sack, they're asked to go in a bad way - it's not very nice; it's inhuman to just tell somebody: "You've got to go." So: "human", "inhuman". "Secure", if you feel secure, you feel safe. If you feel insecure, then you don't feel safe. So: "secure", "insecure". And then, finally, for "in": "visible". If something is visible, you can see it; it's right there. I can see the camera; it's visible. But if something is invisible... If the camera is hidden and I don't know I'm being filmed, then it's an invisible camera. So: "visible", "invisible". Anything you can't see is invisible. Okay. There's one funny, little exception with the "in" prefix. If somebody's famous, then they're a celebrity; they're very well-known, they're on television all the time, they're in films, etc. So they're famous. Famous person. If you see them in the street, you think: "Oh my goodness! Wow! It's that famous actor right near me in the street." Okay? So you might think that the prefix "in" with "famous" would mean the opposite; that they're not famous, but it doesn't mean that. This is an exception. If something or somebody is infamous... And the pronunciation changes a little bit. The pronunciation of the "a": "famous", but "infamous". So, the "a" vowel sound changes. […]

7 месяцев назад
100 HARDEST English words pronunciation practice lesson (with definitions) | Learn British English

100 HARDEST English words pronunciation practice lesson (with definitions) | Learn British English

The 100 most difficult advanced British English vocabulary words with IPA phonetic transcriptions and definitions. This video will help you build vocabulary and improve pronunciation in under 20 minutes. Lucy xoxo Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Edited by Connor Hinde: hinde.business@gmail.com Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH FREE Grammar Checker: https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SH1B9 Apply DISCOUNT coupons and codes automatically: https://joinhoney.com/ref/7wypw61(I love this, it's the best invention ever! Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_p... My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 FAQ: - Where are you from? I grew up in Bedfordshire, a county near London! - How many languages do you speak? I speak fluent Spanish and I'm learning Italian. You can see a video of me speaking Spanish here: https://goo.gl/4RVY0O - Which camera do you use? I use the Canon 60D (Discontinued - updated version here: (http://amzn.to/2z5I7K8) with a 50mm lens (http://amzn.to/2z7kgtq) - Which microphone do you use? I use the SONY ECMCS3 - Very affordable and great value for money: (http://amzn.to/2yOg9Sk) (Note that you will need this mic adapter if you want to use it with your iphone - http://amzn.to/2z6gNeD) I also use the Blue Yeti in vintage white for my voiceover work: http://amzn.to/2z4lHJa http://amzn.to/2yJPjLD - Which editing software do you use? Final Cut Pro X Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a notification in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.

7 месяцев назад
How to Speak Cockney / Practice English with Paul

How to Speak Cockney / Practice English with Paul

How to Speak Cockney A lot of interesting posts by me: http://vk.com/id290352757 01:08 non-rhotic R 01:43 trap-bath-split 02:05 glottal stop 03:02 the L vocalization 04:03 TH becomes V 04:27 H is dropped 04:55 TH fronting 05:34 Practice/Examples http://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=mmum5Pp5Rq4

4 лет назад
MAY or MIGHT?

MAY or MIGHT?

Is there a difference between "may" and "might"? These words have a similar meaning and are usually used to talk about a possibility or to politely ask for permission. In this lesson, you'll learn how these words differ from each other and how to use them correctly. I'll teach you the common usages of "may" and "might" and show you examples of how they are used in sentences and expressions. I'll also discuss "maybe" and "may be"—English learners and even native speakers often get confused with these. After watching, take the quiz to make sure you've understood everything! https://www.engvid.com/may-or-might/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com and today the lesson is about the two words "may" and "might", and I know these can be a little bit confusing because they are connected. "May" and "might" come from the same verb, but it's a rather strange verb that is only used in certain ways. So, I'm just going to give you a few examples to show how these words are actually used in sentences and in different situations. So, starting with "may", which as you know, is also the name of a month, it can be a woman's name, but it's also a verb. And it's used in two main different ways. It's used to express something that is possible, a possibility of something happening; and it can also be used differently to ask permission in a polite way, to say: "May I do something?" It's more polite than saying: "Can I" or "Could I". "Could I" is polite, "Can I" is less polite, but "May I" is the really nice, polite way of asking for something. Okay, so let's have a look first of all at "may" used to express something possible, a possibility. So, first of all: I've lost my gloves. I can't find my gloves that go on my hands. So I say to my friend: "Oh, I can't find my gloves." And my friend replies: "Do you think you may have dropped them in the street?" Okay. So I was walking through the street with my friend, we have arrived home. "Do you think you may have dropped them in the street? Is that possible that you dropped them somewhere?" So, that's possibility. Okay. And again, going out again, so in this colder weather, my friend says: "You'd better take a coat - it may get cold later." If we're going out in the daytime, but we're going to be out in the evening as well when it gets colder, so: "You'd better take a coat." Good advice. "Take a coat. It may get cold later." It's possible it will get cold later and you'll need to put your coat on. Okay? And then finally for these examples of what is possible, I say to my friend: "Was that John who just walked by? Someone walked by, was that John?" And my friend replies: "It may have been. I'm not sure." Because my friend didn't really see. It may have been, but I'm not really sure. So, possibly. Possibly it was John. I'm not 100% sure. Okay, so those are three examples of this first meaning of "may". And then just two examples of asking permission using "may" in a polite way. If I don't have a pen, I can say to someone: "May I borrow your pen, please?" Okay. "To borrow" is just to have for a short time, use it, give it back. Okay. "May I borrow your pen, please?" That's all very polite. "May I", "please". Okay? And then finally, somebody asks you a question and it's maybe quite a complicated thing. You can't decide. They invite you to something, you can't decide: Yes, no, not sure. You need to think about it. So, you reply: "I can't decide at the moment - may I have a few days to think about it?" Okay? And hopefully the other person is willing to give you time to think. It might be a very serious decision, so: "May I have a few days? Give me some time to think about it." Okay, so that's the two main meanings for "may". We'll now move on to look at "might". Okay, so moving on to "might". It's similar in a way, similar to the first meaning of "may", meaning possible. Okay? But the feeling with "might" is that it's a little bit less likely to be true. It's more remote, less possible. There's more doubt about it. Okay? Just slightly more doubt. So let's have a look at some examples. Okay, so I might say: "I don't feel well." And my friend might say: "Oh dear - do you think it might be something you've eaten? Some food you've eaten. Do you think it might be, possibly?" With some doubt. Maybe she cooked the dinner so she doesn't want to think it was anything she cooked. So: "Do you think it might be?" Okay? Another example, someone asks: "Where are you going for your holidays?" And I might reply: "We haven't decided yet, but we might go to Italy." It's possible, possible, but not definite. "We might go to Italy." Another example, you're waiting for your friend to arrive, Anna. "Anna hasn't arrived yet - do you think she might have forgotten?" the arrangement to meet. "Do you think she might have forgotten?" It's not... It's not like her to forget, so there's a lot of doubt there. "She might have forgotten, but mm." Okay?

2 лет назад
Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce 'THE'

Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce 'THE'

Did you know that the little word 'the' can be pronounced in two different ways? But when do you use each pronunciation? In this lesson, I will explain a simple rule that will tell you how to pronounce it in all cases. Watch this pronunciation lesson and erase your mistakes! Next, watch this lesson on the difference between 'A' and 'AN': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zFF7tXmfR0 Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/2-ways-to-pronounce-the/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill from engVid, and today's lesson is about the little word "the", and how to say it, how to pronounce it. You might think: "What? I know how to pronounce that word", but there are two different ways of pronouncing it, and this lesson is designed to show you how to work out which way to say it. Okay. So, the simple rule is: Before a consonant you say "thuh", but before a vowel sound you say "thee". So it's either "thuh" or "thee". So, let me just go through some examples to show you how that works. So, before a consonant sound: "thuh". "The banana", "the dog", but then we get our first exception, which is confusing because this word begins with an E which is a vowel letter, but the way it's pronounced, it has a "ya" at the beginning: "Ya. European. European", so we say: "Thuh European", okay? So that's a slight confusion to be aware of. Continuing on: "The flowers", "the house", "the man", "the people". Another exception again because this word begins with a U, which is a vowel letter, but the actual sound when you say this sound is a "ya", "university", "university". It's not: "university", it's "university". So: "thUH university", okay? And finally: "The woman, the woman". So that's "the" before a consonant sound. So, let's have a look at the other column. Before the vowel sound we say "thee", so: "The apple", "the elephant", "the ice cream", "the orange", "the umbrella". You can see here "umbrella" also begins with a U, just like "university", but it's not pronounced: "yumbrella", it's pronounced: "umbrella", so: "thee umbrella, the umbrella". Okay. And finally, here's another funny one, it begins with an H, so you might think: "Well, that's a consonant", but it is actually a vowel sound because we don't pronounce the H in this word. You may know the word "heir", which we had in another lesson about using "a" and "an". The heir is usually, well, male, and the heiress, female; but often the word "heir" is used for female as well nowadays for reasons of equality. So, but: "the heiress", "e", so it's an "e", "heiress", so that's a vowel sound, so: "the heiress". Okay? So that's another one to remember, along with the "ya" sound here. So, it's purely the way you say it which decides whether it's "thuh" or "thee". Okay? So now we'll move on to a second screen, and we'll do some sentences for you to work out how to pronounce each time the word "the" or "the" appears, so... Okay, so what I should have said at the end of the last section was the word "heir" and "heiress", I didn't explain what they meant. So, if you hadn't seen the other lesson you wouldn't... You might not know that, so "an heir" or "an heiress" is someone who inherits something, often money or property, something like that. So, okay. Right, so here is the test for you of how to pronounce the word "t-h-e": "thuh" or "thee", and as you can see, we have some sentences here. And every time the word appears I've underlined it in red just to help you to see it. So, first sentence: "The ferry crossed the Irish Sea." So, how would you pronounce the word there? Okay. So: "thuh" goes before a consonant sound, so "f" is a consonant, so: "Thuh fairy. The fairy crossed", and what about this one? "I" is a vowel sound, so it's "thee Irish Sea, the Irish Sea". So: "The fairy crossed the Irish Sea." Okay? Next one: "The right way is the only way." Okay, so how would you pronounce those two? So, "r" is a consonant, so: "Thuh right way. The right way is", "only", that begins with an "o", which is a vowel, "only". So: "thee only way. The right way is the only way." Okay? Next one, we have three examples in this sentence, so: "The answer is at the back of the book." So, what would you do there? "The answer, the back, the book", so "answer" begins with "a", which is a vowel, so it's: "Thee answer. The answer is at". "Back" and "book" begin with "b", which is a consonant, so: "Thuh back of thuh book." Okay. Next one: "The fire hasn't reached the upper floor". "Upper" means at the top of the building, up at the top. Okay, so: "fire" begins with an "f", so that's a consonant, so: "thuh fire. The fire hasn't reached", "upper" begins with "u" which is a vowel sound, so it's: "thee upper floor. The fire hasn't reached the upper floor." Okay. Right. Next one: "The girl felt at home in the empty house." So if you feel at home, you feel comfortable, you like your surroundings. Okay. So: "girl" begins with "g" which is a consonant, so: "thuh girl.

1 лет назад
BRITISH vs. AMERICAN English: 100+ Differences Illustrated | Learn English Vocabulary

BRITISH vs. AMERICAN English: 100+ Differences Illustrated | Learn English Vocabulary

Part II - https://youtu.be/1ujoK86b2QQ American & British Spelling Differences: https://youtu.be/A-KyynN0qMY Extensive list of 200+ Differences between British and American English with pictures for Kids and English learners: https://7esl.com/british-and-american-english/ American English is the form of English used in the United States. British English is the form of English used in the United Kingdom.

7 месяцев назад
Intonation: Asking Questions in British English

Intonation: Asking Questions in British English

My British Pronunciation Course: https://www.etjenglish.com Skype Lessons: https://etjenglish.acuityscheduling.com In this intonation/pronunciation lesson, I teach you the basic / general rules for asking questions with a British English accent. Website: http://www.etjenglish.com Facebook: https://facebook.com/etjenglish Twitter: https://twitter.com/etjenglish Instagram: https://instagram.com/ etjenglish You can also support me and receive rewards on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/etjenglish

2 лет назад
Basic English – How and when to use DO, DOES, and DID

Basic English – How and when to use DO, DOES, and DID

Do you know when and how to use the verb "to do"? In this basic English grammar lesson, I will explain how "do" is used with different verb tenses when you make a negative statement and when you ask a question. Learn how to use this verb in the present, past, and present continuous tenses in all kinds of sentences. DO you want to watch? Yes, of course you DO! DID you click on the lesson yet? http://www.engvid.com/do-does-did/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from www.engvid.com, and today, we're going to look at the verb "to do", looking at "do", "does", and "did", and the way it's used, not all within a positive sentence or statement, but the way it often needs to be included in a negative statement, and also how it has to be used in a question. Okay? So, I've just got an example here to show you what... What I mean. Okay? So, just a simple sentence: "You walk." Okay? "You walk." So, we've got the pronoun "you", the person. "P" for pronoun, "p" for person. Okay? And the verb: to walk. "You walk." Okay? But, what happens? Now this is in the present tense, and what happens is in some tenses, you have to use "do", but in other tenses you don't need it. So we're going to see the different types of sentence with different tenses to show when to use it and when not to use it, and also how to use it. Okay? So: "You walk." Simple present tense. If you turn that into the negative, it's: "You do not walk." or "You don't walk." You can't just say: "You not walk". You have to use: "You do not walk." And so, because "do" is also a verb, the way it's used here is to sort of help the meaning and that means it's called an auxiliary verb. Okay? So, I'll just put "aux", auxiliary verb. And the "not" is the negative. Okay? So: "You do not walk." or "You don't walk." In speech, when we're speaking, we say: "You don't". Maybe if you're writing a formal essay for an exam, it's best not to use contractions, abbreviations, like "don't". It's better to use "do not". Okay? So: "You do not walk." That's the negative. Okay? And then, again, if we turn it into a question and you're asking the person, it's: "Do" again. "Do...? Do you walk?" So: "You walk", "Do you walk?" Okay? So "do" is the auxiliary; "you" is the person, the pronoun; and "walk" is the verb. Okay? So: "You walk.", "You don't walk.", "Do you walk?" Okay. So, there, in the simple present tense for the negative and for the question, you need to use "do" as an extra and as an auxiliary verb. Okay? Right, so now I've got some little exercises to give you a chance to see if you can do them yourself before I say what they should be. Okay? So, we've got this one here: "I swim every day." Very healthy. I don't, actually, but some people do. Swim, swimming in a swimming pool. "I swim every day." Okay? So, if you are going to turn that into the negative... I just said it probably, without realizing. I hope you've forgotten what I've said now when I gave you the negative. [Laughs]. I'm not going to do that every time, don't worry. "Don't worry." Okay, so: "I swim every day." What would be the negative? "I ____ ____ _____ ___." Just have a think before I tell you what it should be: "I", then we have to use "do not"/"don't", "I don't", and then it's the same. We've got "walk" there and "walk" there, so it's just: "I don't swim every day." Okay? So you just have to put "don't" in there: "I don't swim every day." Okay? And then, again, for the question version of it: "I swim every day." And then somebody asks or I ask... I don't know why I would ask that question. I should know the answer, but: "Do", what should it be? "Do I swim every day?" So, "swim every day", "walk", "walk", "swim every day". "Do I swim every day?" Okay. So, it's always "Do" at the beginning of the question, and then you just use the same words. Okay, so let's try the next one. I hope by now that you understand what I'm explaining about the verb "to do". "You understand." Okay? Now, what if it's still negative? I'm not going to say it this time; I'll leave it for you to think: How would you say the negative of this? "You __ ___ understand." Okay? So, it's: "You", like this one here, "don't"... Sorry about my writing. "You don't" and then "understand" again. Okay? "You understand.", "You don't understand." Right? And then the question version, I've already started it with: "Do", so if I'm asking you yes or no: "Do you understand?" Okay? So: "Do you understand?" And the question mark, of course, at the end. Always remember the question mark. Right. Okay. So I hope that's clear so far.

3 лет назад
Learn English Conversation - Oxford English Daily Conversation Part 1

Learn English Conversation - Oxford English Daily Conversation Part 1

☞ Please share and like if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥ ☞ Subscribe for more: https://goo.gl/3qNzzg Learn to speak english, improve your English Vocabulary, Listening, Speaking, More and More... —————————————————————————— Good morning. It`s seven thirty. I`m Gary Fenton. Here is the news. The Prime Minister is in the United States today... ...for talks with the American president at the White House. The talks are very important for British and American... —————————————————————————— ▼ DISCLAIMER ➤ If you wanna use my uploads in your videos/streams, please give a link back to my original video, that's all. ➤ If you have problems about copyright or label and (owners) want to remove this video, please CONTACT US DIRECTLY before doing anything. We will respectfully remove it. Email : services@english7levels.com

1 лет назад
What's it like to move to the UK?

What's it like to move to the UK?

What's it like to move to and live in London? In this video, I interview Kamila, one of my students, who moved to the UK from Poland. You will hear about Kamila's experiences of coming to the UK to live, study, and work. Kamila talks about her first impressions, the weather, the food, and the differences between her life in Poland and in London. And of course, we talk about her experience of learning English and adapting to life and work in an English-speaking country! Watch over 1000 English lesson videos for free at https://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT Gill: Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com and today's lesson is not really a lesson because we're doing something a little bit different. We're having an interview with someone I know who has come to the UK from another country and is living and working here. So, I'd like to introduce Camilla, and we're going to ask her some questions about her experience of coming to the UK and living here. So, let's get started. So, Camilla, thank you for coming. Kamila: Thank you for having me. Gill: It's lovely to see you. You're very welcome. Thank you. And so, would you like to tell us a little bit about yourself, where you're from, how you came to decide to come to the UK? Kamila: Yes, so my name is Camilla. I come from Poland. So my first language is Polish. Before I arrived in the UK I have lived in Warsaw for a couple of years. And so I worked there for a bank for over seven years in corporate banking as Product Manager. And here in London I work for a fintech startup. I'm a credit analyst of small companies. I really like my job. I enjoy it. There is a lot of going on there. My company is still developing, so I also have opportunities to develop in diverse areas. Gill: Okay. Kamila: So yeah, I'm really happy to be part of it. Gill: Oh, that's good. So, lovely. So, "fintech", that means financial...? Kamila: Financial and technology. Gill: Finance and technology. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: Used together for... Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: Financial, for funding. Kamila: Yeah, because... Yeah, exactly. Because we lent money for small companies, but making our credit decisions we use a lot of technology. We use some algorithms and so on, so that's why fintech. Gill: Okay, lovely. So, have you always spoken English? When did you first start to learn English in your life? Kamila: Yeah, so I learned English in high school and during my studies. Also after I finished my education I attended some English lessons in Poland where I was working there. And so I felt that I understood quite a lot, but I had a fear of speaking because I think that in my opinion teachers put a lot of pressure on drama, which is good of course, but there is... Because of that there is a little time for practicing speaking, so a lot of people fear of speaking. They don't feel confident enough to speak. Yeah, and that was also my case. Gill: Yes. I think I experienced the same when I was at school. It was... A lot of it was based on written, and reading and writing. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: And exams, writing exams and the tests. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: So... So... So since then, do you feel that you...? Was it when you came to the UK that you started getting more practice at speaking? Kamila: Yes, exactly. So, I feel that since I arrived here in the UK my English language skills have improved. I feel more confident. So, yeah, I decided that first couple month I would work on my English, so I read lots of newspapers, I watched some TV programs, I watched some TV series with subtitles, and I also attended private English lessons with great teacher. Gill: Oh. [Laughter] Kamila: Who has also helped me not only to improve my spoken English, but also to... It gave me some insight into English culture and politics sometimes, and everyday life, and things to see in London, so I really enjoyed that and I would recommend it to everyone who... Gill: Yeah. Kamila: Is thinking about moving to UK, for example. Gill: Yeah, so I remember we... We've had a lot of very interesting conversations about English politics. Kamila: Yeah. Gill: And about the culture and different types of food. Kamila: Yeah, yeah. Gill: And all of that. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: So... So, did you ever come to the UK for a holiday before you came to live here? Kamila: Yeah, so it's a funny story because the first school trip abroad I took part in was to London, I was 11 years old, but I can still recall some memories from this trip. For example, my first impression was that there were lots of people walking along the pavement, so it was really crowded. And also I saw a lot of people very smart dressed and it was a really big surprise for me because then I lived in small city, so you know, that smart clothes were designed for some special occasions, like wedding or something, and here I saw a lot of people so smart, like dressed up, so... Gill: Yes, being the capital city. Kamila: Yeah.

1 лет назад