Learn British accents and dialects – Cockney, RP, Northern, and more!

Описание

Did you know that there are over 30 different English accents in England alone? And that's not all. Would you believe there are over a hundred different English dialects accross the world? In this lesson, I will tell you about some common British accents you might hear. You'll hear examples of Cockney, RP, Estuary, Northern, Scottish, Welsh, and many more accents. Don't miss this opportunity to add some spice to your English pronunciation and comprehension! Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/learn-british-accents-and-dialects-cockney-rp-northern-and-more/

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is about accents in the U.K. So, U.K. accents and also dialects. Okay, so what's the difference between an accent and a dialect? Right. Well, an accent, as you know, is to do with pronunciation, how you pronounce the word. Dialect is when you have a word that only people in a certain area of the country use; it's not a national word, it's a local word that maybe people from other parts of the country, they won't even know what it means, so that's dialect. Okay. So, let's just have a look through some of the accents that we have in the U.K.

The one that you're probably learning as you're learning to pronounce English words is RP. "RP" stands for "Received Pronunciation". It's a slightly strange term. "Received" where do you receive it from? Well, maybe you receive it from your teacher. This is how to say this word. It's a slightly strange expression, but RP, it's usually referred to by the initials. And it's the kind of accent you will hear if you're watching BBC Television programs or listening to BBC Radio. Not everybody on the BBC speaks with an RP accent. The news readers tend to be RP speakers, but not always. But the strange thing is that in this country, only a very small percentage of people do speak with this accent. Apparently, just 3%, but they tend to be people in positions of power, authority, responsibility. They probably earn a lot of money. They live in big houses. You know the idea. So, people like the Prime Minster, at the moment David Cameron, he went to a private school, he went to university, Oxford, so people who have been to Oxford and Cambridge Universities often speak in RP, even if they didn't speak in RP before they went to Oxford or Cambridge, they often change their accent while they are there because of the big influence of their surroundings and the people that they're meeting. So that's RP. It's a very clear accent. So, it's probably a good idea to either learn to speak English with an RP accent, or you may be learning with an American accent, a Canadian accent, all of those accents are very clear. Okay. And being clear is the most important thing.

Okay, so moving on. RP, as I should have said, is mostly in the south of the country; London and the south. So, also "Cockney" and "Estuary English" are in the south. Okay. So, Cockney is the local London accent, and it tends to spread further out to places like Kent, Essex, other places like that. Surrey. There's a newer version of Cockney called "Estuary English". If you think an estuary is connected to a river, so the River Thames which flows across the country, goes quite a long way west. So anyone living along the estuary, near the river can possibly have this accent as well.

So, just to give you some examples, then, of the Cockney accent, there are different features. So, one example is the "th" sound, as you know to make a "th" sound, some of you may find it difficult anyway, "the", when you put your tongue through your teeth, "the", but a Cockney person may not use the "the", they will use an "f" sound or a "v" sound instead, so the word "think", "I think", they would say would say instead of: "think", they would say it like that: "fink", "fink", and the top teeth are on the bottom lip, "think". And words like "with" that end with the "th", instead of "with", it will be "wiv", "wiv", "wiv". "Are you coming wiv me?" So that is one of the things that happens with the Cockney accent.

Words like "together" would be "togever". Okay? The number "three", t-h-r-e-e is often pronounced "free": "We have free people coming to dinner. Free people." So, there can be confusion there, because we have the word "free", which has a meaning in itself, "free", but if you actually mean "three", the number three, there can be some confusion. So don't get confused by "free people". -"Oh, they're free? They're free to come?" -"No, there are three of them. Three people who are free to come." Ah, okay.

Learn British accents and dialects – Cockney, RP, Northern, and more! скачать видео - Download

Похожие видео

Discover the History of English

Discover the History of English

Did you know that the English word "human" has a Latin origin? And did you know that the word "people" actually comes from French? Today, hundreds of millions of people speak English either as their first or second language. But hundreds of years ago, the English language that we know today did not exist. It has been evolving through the centuries and continues to do so now. In this lesson, I will teach you the history of invasions, migrations, and other influences that have helped to shape English as we know it. You will also discover English words that have origins in Latin, French, and other languages. Don't miss this fascinating lesson! http://www.engvid.com/discover-the-history-of-english/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill from engVid, and today... As you know, I usually teach an aspect of the English language, but today, we're going to be looking at the English language from a different perspective, a different angle, and looking at the history of the language and how it has developed, because the English language hasn't always been the way it is today. It's developed over hundreds and hundreds of years. Now, today, hundreds of millions of people speak English all over the world, whether it's their first language or their second language, or just one of the foreign languages that they speak and learn at school, and so on. So, hundreds of millions of people speak English and learn English. But hundreds of years ago, the English language that we know today didn't really exist. It sort of got put together gradually by different historical events. So we're going to go back in history now, and have a look at a timeline. I don't know if you've seen a timeline before, but it is literally the time, the years going from left to right, like you get on a graph if you've done graphs, and the time goes across along the line. So the different developments that happened can be shown on that line. So we're starting here in 55 BC, hundreds of years ago, and we're coming up to... Well, beyond. We have 1066, here, but because I ran out of space on the board, the time went on for such a long time, I couldn't get all the centuries in, but I will still tell you about them. Okay. But these are the very interesting parts, which are on the board. So, 55 BC, the Roman invasion of Britain, of the U.K., where we are at the moment. So, you've heard of the Roman Empire with Julius Caesar and all the other Caesars, the Roman Empire that spread in different directions, and Britain is one of the directions they spread in. They came here, and stayed for a while, and built some nice buildings, and they built a wall that goes across between Scotland and England, called Hadrian's Wall, because the Emperor at the time was called Hadrian. So, anyway, when they came and stayed for some time, they brought their language with them, the Latin language. Okay? And the Latin language, it's called a dead language today, but it has influenced so many other languages, especially in Southern Europe, so languages like Italian, French, Spanish, Portuguese, they all come from Latin. So, in this country, in the English language, we have had the Latin influence at different times. So, the Romans brought their Latin language with them. Okay? So that influenced the way people were speaking to each other as time went on. And the natives of this country started learning Latin words, and it became integrated into the language. Okay, so let's have a look at some of the words that we use today that were influenced or that came from Latin words. Right? And we have this pie chart, here, which you may know if you've been studying things for IELTS and the writing task. A pie chart... So, the whole circle represents 100%. So if you're thinking of all the words in the English language at the moment, Latin, the Latin words that came from... Partly from the Roman invasion, we have 29% of the words in the English language have come from a Latin origin, from a source, Latin source. Okay. So here are just a few of very words that we use every day, really. Words like: "human", "animal", "dental" to do with the teeth, "decimal" which is to do with the fingers because we have 10 fingers, "decimal", and "digital", also fingers, "factory" where things are made, manufacture, "library" where you read books, "libre" meaning book, "library", the building where the books are kept, "manual" to do with if you do things with your hand it comes from the Latin word for "hand", "manual". "Lunar" to do with the moon, because the Latin word for the moon was "luna", "luna". And "solar" to do with the sun, again, because the Latin word was like that, "solar". "Military", anything to do with soldiers because the Latin Roman Empire soldiers were... That was the word that was used for "soldiers". "Melees" I think. And we also get our "mile", the distance, the mile from that, because that was the distance that they would march, I think, before they had a rest or something like that.

3 лет назад
Accents - BRITISH vs AMERICAN: English Accents Around the World

Accents - BRITISH vs AMERICAN: English Accents Around the World

Accents - BRITISH vs AMERICAN. Here is the other video we shot for Gabby's channel. Enjoy! Hilarious Differences in Dialect - https://youtu.be/qWp0qTJH6OE During this lesson we will discover some of the differences between a British English accent and a general American accent. Thank you to Gabby from Go Natural English for helping me with this video. For more accent videos see the links below. Anna's Pronunciation Course: www.britishenglishpro.com FREE AUDIOBOOKS TRIAL (HIGHLY RECOMMENDED) - http://amzn.to/2lPS05r ====== 🙏CONTRIBUTE🙏 ====== 🙏 TRANSLATE MY VIDEOS: https://goo.gl/qBZs1O 🏆 JOIN OUR PATRON TEAM: https://www.patreon.com/AnnaTyrie Credit to every member of my Patreon team, with special thanks to: Ewa, Benjamin, Paolo, Vincenzo and Ibolya ======= RELATED VIDEOS ======= BRITISH ACCENTS PLAYLIST: https://goo.gl/pf3zkt 250 MOST COMMON WORDS - https://youtu.be/WgPgiTYW_tU PREPOSITIONS ON, AT, IN - https://youtu.be/XrAOFVofeLM FRUIT IDIOMS - https://youtu.be/6OovqtTcZO4 PRONUNCIATION - https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_Zjf61X10RKpPve7Op8CF_8T0OpCzsb- ====== My Links ======= MY WHATSAPP GROUP https://youtu.be/nlMHjq0LOHg PRONUNCIATION COURSE www.britishenglishpro.com SOCIAL PLATFORM www.englishlikeanative.me OTHER YOUTUBE CHANNELS www.youtube.com/user/verbalessons www.youtube.com/user/annatyrie www.youtube.com/c/BellaBeansTV MY SOCIAL MEDIA ACCOUNTS www.facebook.com/BritishEnglishLikeaNative www.instagram.com/britishenglishpro ======= ENGLISH PRODUCTS ====== ☕ UNION JACK MUG: http://amzn.to/2o39FdV 🇬🇧 Grammar Exercises: BEGINNERS: http://amzn.to/2qxfSjN 🇬🇧 Grammar : INTERMEDIATE: http://amzn.to/2sbAdbk 🇬🇧 Grammar: ADVANCED: http://amzn.to/2qDtDZo 🤓 IELTS Complete Study Guide: http://amzn.to/2sbHHuY ======== FREE TRIALS ========= (If you haven't already, then I recommend taking advantage of the following free trials to aid your English learning) FREE MUSIC - www.amazon.co.uk/music/unlimited?&tag=e0069-21 FREE MOVIES - www.amazon.co.uk/tryprimefree?tag=e0069-21 FREE AUDIOBOOKS - http://amzn.to/2lPS05r ======== TRAVEL CREDIT ======== BUS: $5 Credit: http://ssqt.co/mLcg84C HOTEL: $35 Credit: www.airbnb.co.uk/c/annat30863 RENT A CAR: $25 Credit https://goo.gl/2VJpwt GEAR: $10 Credit towards your first purchase of $50 or more: http://www.theclymb.com/invite/AnnaTyrie ============================== Thanks for Watching - Please SUBSCRIBE! Anna ❤ 🇬🇧 BUSINESS ENQUIRIES ONLY: englishlikeanative@gmail.com

1 лет назад
10 Grammar Errors that Drive British People CRAZY | British English Grammar Lesson #Spon

10 Grammar Errors that Drive British People CRAZY | British English Grammar Lesson #Spon

Learn about the top 10 grammar mistakes that make the British crazy! British natives hate it when people (especially other natives) make these errors! ITALKI OFFER: Buy 1 lesson, get $10 free credits at italki: http://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy Thank you to italki for sponsoring this video. Love, Lucy xoxo MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH OXFORD ENGLISH language course: https://englishll.com/lucy/ Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue £10 free makeup on FeelUnique: http://referme.to/9niUkCo Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_p... My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a #Spon in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.

5 месяцев назад
How To Sound BRITISH **6 tips**

How To Sound BRITISH **6 tips**

How to sound British - learn to speak in a British accent and style using these six tips to sound more British. It's easy when you know how. Some tips are based on the words you use, some on how you pronounce those words and the rest are a mixture of both. Hope you enjoyed this video and found it useful if you did let me know - leave a comment and click like! Usually I teach Arabic on YouTube but this is something a bit different. ================================================== Find an online Arabic/English teacher HERE: http://go.italki.com/stepbysteparabic Join me on Patreon for help, tips and advice on learning Arabic/English HERE: http://bit.ly/2spKwKS ================================================== I’m Mike from England and my videos mostly teach Arabic phrases. I also do the occasional Arabic music video and travel video from somewhere cool I’ve been. Welcome to my channel! 🔴 ARABIC LESSONS: http://bit.ly/2exLxgd 🔴 SINGING ARABIC SONGS: http://bit.ly/2vAmRe3 🔴 TRAVEL VIDEOS: http://bit.ly/2vT7Krm SUBSCRIBE for much more like this. ►http://www.youtube.com/user/stepbysteparabic?sub_confirmation=1 INSTAGRAM: http://instagram.com/arabic.mike TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheArabicMike FACEBOOK: https://www.facebook.com/ArabicMike MY SITE: ► http://ArabicMike.com ================================================== If you want to connect with me directly then consider joining my Patreon page (below) https://www.patreon.com/arabicmike I am always available to chat to on there – text or voice - so it’s a good place to hang out and talk about Arabic or English or the Middle East or anything else! Click the link for more info and hopefully see you there soon. https://www.patreon.com/arabicmike ================================================== LINKS TO REFERENCED CLIPS: I Swear English https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RLcCwcMa0qM Henry’s British English https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zj8J-j4r2VM& Things British people say https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UNgtokCPcJ0 Keira Knightley Interview https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hWerw7WfVaM Ed Sheeran Song https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DNumeY1XcRs The Saturdays https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7lEUHD1vOn4 Damien Rice https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWqmuaZGANM Matthew P https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eQze-wjcGVA& Jurassic 5 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KeN9c2GYJkk

5 месяцев назад
London Accents: RP | Cockney | Multicultural London English

London Accents: RP | Cockney | Multicultural London English

Today I'm joined by Joel & Lia to teach you guys the three main London accents; Received Pronunciation (RP), Cockney and Multicultural London English (MLE). We give you a little bit of background about each accent and then we use example sentences to teach you the differences between them. Britain has many different accents so if you enjoyed this pronunciation lesson and you would like more let me know in the comments below. Please go and send love to Joel & Lia's channel - https://www.youtube.com/user/joelandlia BBC English Accent Tutorial - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bSOh8FEr-1c Do you want to improve your listening? Sign up to Audible for a free 30 day trial - http://bit.ly/2AoARJ6 If you enjoyed this video please SHARE it with anyone you know studying English and of course hit the LIKE button. Stay connected with me on social media Website: http://www.eatsleepdreamenglish.com/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/eatsleepdreamenglish Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/eatsleepdreamenglish Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/EatSleepDreamEnglish Camera: Canon G7X Editing Software: Final Cut Pro X Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com)

7 месяцев назад
20 ITALIAN WORDS YOU'RE SAYING WRONG!

20 ITALIAN WORDS YOU'RE SAYING WRONG!

► 20 ITALIAN WORDS YOU'RE SAYING WRONG! *EXPAND* Hi Friends! Thank you for watching :) This is a collaboration with two of my amazing friends Coral & Riccardo from Itallish. We put together a list of words commonly mispronounced words outside of Italy and thought we would share them with you! Hope it makes you laugh :) xx ITALLISH: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC7qO-hQDbxAl7OIlWDvdozA MOVING TO ITALY PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKHaalipwOba1bnP6tMegEr3EjILSvQ7S SELF-IMPROVEMENT PLAYLIST: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLKHaalipwObYOK1kUrsR_z8lS2nfHO03N Let's Connect :-) Blog: https://zoeyarielle.com/ Instagram: http://bit.ly/ZoInsta Twitter: http://bit.ly/ZoTweets Facebook: http://bit.ly/ZoFacebook Pinterest: https://www.pinterest.com/zoeyarielle/ Snapchat: ZoeyPoulsen Donations: https://www.paypal.me/ZoeyArielle Xo Zo ► MY FILMING EQUIPMENT: Canon G7x Camera: http://amzn.to/2oDIExt Nikon Cool Pix Camera: http://amzn.to/2p1MYDc Manfrotto (BEST Tripod): http://amzn.to/2nbFelH Bower Tripod: http://amzn.to/2nbHokW

2 лет назад
One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

One Woman, 17 British Accents - Anglophenia Ep 5

Siobhan Thompson performs a tour of the accents of the British Isles - and the celebrities who speak with them! Five lessons to help you do a better British accent here: http://www.bbcamerica.com/anglophenia/2014/04/five-lessons-help-sort-british-accent/ Photos via AP Images. Follow Anglophenia on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/anglophenia Follow Anglophenia on Tumblr: http://anglophenia.tumblr.com Follow Siobhan Thompson on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/vornietom

4 лет назад
Learn English - 4 ways to understand what you hear

Learn English - 4 ways to understand what you hear

Learn how to understand almost everything you hear right now in 4 easy steps! If you are an advanced English student, and you already know grammar and can understand what you read, but have trouble understanding when people speak in movies and in real life, watch this lesson to find out HOW to listen and UNDERSTAND! http://www.engvid.com/4-listening-comprehension-tips/

6 лет назад
Using metaphors to speak English more fluently

Using metaphors to speak English more fluently

Do you know what a metaphor is? I'd like to show you how English speakers commonly use metaphors in everyday conversations. Metaphors make our language more interesting and beautiful. I'll give you many examples of metaphors and show you how they are used. I'll teach you some easy metaphors like "busy bee" and "melting pot", and even show you an extended metaphor written by Shakespeare. If you're learning about metaphors in school, it's also important to understand the difference between metaphors and similes and to know their definitions. Practice these expressions and use them when you're speaking to your friends and classmates. After the lesson, test your understanding of metaphors by taking the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/using-metaphors-to-speak-english-more-fluently/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from www.engvid.com, and today in this lesson, we're going to look at metaphors, which are a different way of using language, really. But these metaphors are used a lot in everyday life. You could also call them idioms. They're a little bit like idioms. And there are a lot of them. But I just want to mention that there are metaphors and similes, and they're similar in a way, but different. So, a metaphor says one thing is another thing. So, for example, in my first sentence, here: "Thanks for helping me - you're an angel!" Okay? An angel is supposed to be a good person who helps people, but you're talking here to an ordinary human being and calling them an angel because they've helped you. Okay. So, you're saying: "You are an angel." So, "you" equals "angel". So, in a metaphor, it's saying something is or somebody is something else. The other type of style of speaking is called a simile, and we'll have another lesson on that; a separate lesson. And with a simile, you don't say "A" is "B", you say "A" is like "B". So, with this one, you'd say: "You are like an angel." Or: "You are as good as an angel." But with the metaphor: "You are an angel." So that's the difference between metaphors and similes. So, please look at the other lesson about similes to see some examples of that. Okay? Right, so concentrating on metaphors. "Thanks for helping me - you're an angel!" if someone helps you. You could say this to somebody if they help you. "Thank you - you're an angel." It's a nice compliment, a nice thing to say to somebody who's helped you. Second example: "The people in that club are just a bunch of sheep!" Okay? "A bunch", that's just sort of casual, informal word. "A bunch", it means a group. A group. A group of people. You can have a bunch of flowers. That's the normal use for "bunch". Bunch of flowers, several flowers held together. But this is people who are being called sheep. They're not literally sheep. People are not sheep; sheep are animals, people are humans. But this is saying the people in that club are a bunch of sheep. They're behaving like sheep, because what sheep do, they all stick together, they all stay together, and they all follow each other. They all do the same thing. So this happens with people sometimes. They... They don't have their own independent ideas; they just copy what everybody else does. So that's the meaning of this... This one. The people in that club are just a bunch of sheep. Okay. This one is probably more of a positive thing to say to somebody: "You're such a busy bee!" It maybe sounds a bit patronizing, perhaps. But if someone is really busy, you can say they're a busy bee. And the two b's is a sort of poetic thing, again. But busy bee. The thing about bees is... The bees that buzz around, they... They're always busy. They're collecting pollen from flowers, and going back to the hive, and they're making honey. So they seem to be busy all the time. So, to call a person a busy bee is that they are also running around and doing things, and being very busy and working a lot, and never stopping. Okay. Here's another one: "London is a melting pot of people and cultures." Okay, so London is a melting pot. It's not literally a pot with food in it. It's a melting pot of people and cultures. The people and cultures aren't being thrown into a pot. London, the city, just contains a lot of people from different cultures and different countries. Okay. Here's a good one from if you're... If you're working in an office or somewhere and you have some ideas, and you tell them to your boss: "I had some good ideas but my boss shot them down." Okay? So to shoot something is like with a gun, [shooting noises], all these good ideas that you've just produced, and your boss doesn't like them or he doesn't like you maybe. But he shoots down your... All your ideas, and they come falling to the floor. Not literally. Again, it's not literally true. Not literally true. It's just a picture in your mind, like your boss with a gun, shooting down your ideas. So he doesn't like any of your ideas, he just shoots them. Destroys them. So, you had some good ideas, but my boss shot them down. Okay?

3 лет назад
English Culture: Manners & How to be polite

English Culture: Manners & How to be polite

In this video, you'll learn about English manners. I'll tell you what we in England consider polite and impolite, and then go into detail about how we eat at the table, make and cancel plans, visit friends, and so much more. Some of these cultural aspects of living in England are different even from other English-speaking countries like the USA! Knowing these rules can help you make friends, get jobs, and even get into a romantic relationship. This video is especially important if you're living or travelling in England -- you could offend someone without even knowing it! Watch the video and leave your shoes ON! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/english-culture-manners/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. In this lesson we're going to look at manners in England. Here are the things that are considered polite, and the things that are not considered polite. So this is a talk about the culture, things that people do here in England, and the things that traditionally have been the most acceptable behaviour. Let's start with the things that are very important. So, I'm sure you already know this one: English people and queuing. "Queuing" is when you stand in a line when you don't... When you want something. You don't just, like, run up there to the front or push. You queue in a line. So, we queue up at the bank, for example, or we queue up when we want to get on a bus and there's some other people already there. Now, of course, in London because there are so many people and also not everyone is English so they have their manners from where they came from, you won't always see people queuing to get on the bus or on the tube, but you do generally still see people queuing up in a shop when they need to buy something. Next we have: It's very important to bring a bottle, and that means when you go to somebody's dinner party you take a bottle of wine when you go to the meal there. If you don't want to bring a bottle of wine, you can bring dessert or you can bring some flowers or some chocolates, but the general phrase and the general idea of it is bringing a bottle, as in a bottle of wine. Next we have RSVP. This is a term that comes from French: "R�pondez s'il vous plait", and this is a much more formal invitation that you get. If you're going to something, a special event like somebody's wedding... Because weddings are really expensive and they have to be organized so long in advance, people having the wedding really want to know if you're coming. So when you RSVP to the invitation it means you're definitely going, you will be there. So once you've RSVP'd, it's very, very impolite not to go. You must go if you RSVP. Next, I think that in England it's very important to be on time. We do tend to be punctual people, attend... Attend meetings at the right time, turn up to our jobs at the right time, or meet friends at the right time, most of us. Of course, there are those people who are always late for everything, but most people in general do things on time or even, like me, I always end up being 10 minutes early. I just can't help that. So I waste a lot of time being too early. Now let's look at table manners. Some of the things in the table manners' section are changing as people become more relaxed about eating and eating out. But these were all... These are all manners that people follow in more formal situations. Perhaps at home or with your very close friends it would be different. Now, I don't mean it's different for this first one. I'm not saying it's ever acceptable anywhere to slurp, burp-I can't do a burp noise. Anyway, you know what a burp is-and fart. Fart is noise from the other end. These things are never acceptable at the dinner table. Mm-mm, mm-mm. So, no eating noises or doing that when you eat. It's not acceptable. Elbows on the table, in a formal situation you're not going to do that, but relaxed with friends a lot of people do put their elbows on the table these days, not such a big deal. Drinking before... Just drinking your drink before somebody said: "Cheers" is considered impolite, but it's also a sign of being familiar with people. If you're familiar with them you don't have to go: "Oh, cheers for this drink and opportunity to drink with you." So it depends who it is. Using a mobile in the restaurant or when you're eating socially with people is considered rude, so to be like: "Oh, hold on. Let me just take this call. I'm so important, I've got to, you know, talk business", or something is considered rude, or to be like all the time texting on your phone. Of course it happens, and young people and teenagers are definitely going to do it more than older people, but on the whole it's considered impolite.

1 лет назад
Shakespeare: Original pronunciation (The Open University)

Shakespeare: Original pronunciation (The Open University)

TELL US WHAT YOU THINK and help us improve our Free Educational Resources https://www.surveymonkey.co.uk/r/YT2017_descr An introduction by David and Ben Crystal to the 'Original Pronunciation' production of Shakespeare and what they reveal about the history of the English language. For more like this subscribe to the Open University channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCXsH4hSV_kEdAOsupMMm4Qw Free learning from The Open University http://www.open.ac.uk/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/english-language Transcript link - http://www.open.edu/openlearn/history-the-arts/culture/english-language/speaking-shakespeare-how-was-shakespeare-pronounced-when-he-was-writing Study ' Shakespeare: text and performance' at the Open University: http://www3.open.ac.uk/study/undergraduate/course/u214.htm ----- The Open University is the world’s leading provider of flexible, high quality online degrees and distance learning, serving students across the globe with highly respected degree qualifications, and the triple accredited MBA. The OU teaches through its own unique method of distance learning, called ‘supported open learning’ and you do not need any formal qualifications to study with us, just commitment and a desire to find out what you are capable of. Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/OUFreeLearning

7 лет назад
English Pronunciation: How to say words ending with -OW: grow, cow, slow, now...

English Pronunciation: How to say words ending with -OW: grow, cow, slow, now...

Some letter combinations in English can be pronounced in different ways, and that is the case for the sound "-ow". It can be said in both a long sound and a short sound, by opening or closing your throat and lips. In this lesson, I'll explain the pronunciation of some common words ending in -ow. Some of them can be pronounced in two different ways and have two different meanings. But most of them can only be pronounced in one way. Some of the words you may already know, but others will be new, so you will expand your vocabulary, too! Take the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-pronunciation-ow/ . WATCH NEXT: 1. Pronunciation of TH & THR: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sPIOxYtguhk&list=PLs_glF4TIn5YX6MbXasE7a0g8wvBUlrtZ&index=4 2. Accent training exercises -- Learn vowel sounds: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r6o6NOjGv7I&list=PLs_glF4TIn5YX6MbXasE7a0g8wvBUlrtZ&index=8 TRANSCRIPT Hello. This is Gill at engVid, and today we have a lesson on the pronunciation of words containing the letters "o-w". Okay? So, there are two different ways of pronouncing these words, and some are pronounced both ways and spelt the same, but they mean different things; there are other words which are only pronounced in one way, and not the other. So, let's just have a look at these examples. Okay. So, "o-w" in the word, it's either the vowel sound: "a-oo", which I've spelt: "a-o-o", "a-oo", like when somebody hits you, you say: "Ow! Ow, that hurt. Ow." Or at least in English we say it that way. Okay. So: "a-oo" is one of the pronunciations. And: "oh", like when you're surprised: "Oh. Oh. I didn't know that. Oh." So: "oh" is the other vowel sound. Okay. So, first of all, let's look at the three words where there are both. So: "a-oo", you can have: "bow" and you can have: "bow". So, "bow" is when you go like this. You sort of bend over politely: "bow". Usually men do that. "Bow". But there's also something called a "bow", which is if you have a ribbon in your hair or something like that, and you tie it in a bow; you do this. Or if you have shoes with laces, you tie your shoelaces in a bow. Okay, so we have: "bow", "ba-oo", and "bow". Right. Okay. Next one: "row" and "row". So, a "row" is a lot of noise. "Oh, there's a row going on out there. That's noisy. People are shouting. There's a row." It could be an argument between people: "They're having a row." The neighbours next door, you can hear their voices, they're having a row; they're disagreeing about something, so that's "row". But "row" is either when things are in lines, like that, that's a line or a row; or you can also... If you're in a boat with oars like this, you row; you row the boat. You're doing this with the wooden oars to get through the water, to move through the water. That's also to row the boat, and it's a rowing boat. Okay. Next one: "sow" and "sow". So, a "sow" is a female pig; that's pretty much the only meaning for it - a female pig is a sow. Okay. To "sow", s-o-w is to put seeds in the ground for them to grow. So, you can link "sow" with "grow", if it helps you remember - put the seeds in the soil, they will grow. Sow the seeds, they will grow. It's not the same as this spelling of "sew", "s-e-w", which is with a needle and thread. If I'm sewing on a button which has come off, that's "sew" with an "e", so it's not that; but it's the same pronunciation. Okay. Right. So those are the three pairs which have both pronunciations. And then we have two lists of words which just have one. So, the "a-oo" vowel sound, we have: "brow", which is the same as your forehead; is your brow. And you've got "eyebrows". These are eyebrows and this is your brow. Okay? "Cow", the animal that you get milk from. The cow. "How? How do you do something? How?" or: "How are you?" "Now", at this moment; now. "Plow", this is the American spelling; the English spelling is slightly different, but it's the same pronunciation. We spell it, in the U.K.: "p-l-o-u-g-h", but the American spelling is "plow" - "p-l-o-w". So, that's another one. To plow a field; to churn up the soil - again, maybe if you're sowing seeds in agriculture. Okay. So, the plow is the equipment that you use to cut into the soil; often pulled by horses, or it may be a tractor or something with an engine nowadays. Okay. "Plow". This word: "pow" is a sort of, like a comic book. "Pow", "pow", when people hit each other. You get this "pow". It sort of represents the sound of someone being hit or something exploding, that sort of thing. Okay. "Prow" is the front of a ship. The prow of a ship. And "vow" is another word for a promise; to vow to do something is to promise to do something. Okay. So those are the "a-oos", there. And then the "oh" list, from here: a "crow" is a bird; a big, black bird. "Crow". "Flow", "flow". Water flows; liquid flows. "Flow". "Glow" is to do with light shining. […]

4 месяцев назад
19 Words Brits and Americans Say Differently

19 Words Brits and Americans Say Differently

Lingoda Language Marathon - http://bit.ly/2NYuMqh Voucher Code - LEARN12 Here are 19 food words that Brits and American say differently. We may share the same language but we use so many different words to describe the same things. This video focuses on food vocabulary. The very lovely Grace helps me understand what the major differences are between British and American English. Give me a big thumbs up and comment if you enjoyed this video : ) Recommended English Resources: - *English Grammar In Use - https://amzn.to/2EUo3ZS - *English Idioms In Use - https://amzn.to/2HrFK84 - *English Phrasal Verbs In Use - https://amzn.to/2EOEaIh *IMPROVE YOUR LISTENING WITH AUDIBLE - http://bit.ly/2AoARJ6 If you enjoyed this video please SHARE it with anyone you know studying English and of course hit the LIKE button. Stay connected with me on social media - Website: http://www.eatsleepdreamenglish.com/ - Instagram: https://bit.ly/2JewHsg - Facebook: https://en-gb.facebook.com/eatsleepdreamenglish/ - Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/EatSleepDreamEnglish.com Camera: Canon G7X Editing Software: Final Cut Pro X Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com) *affiliate links

4 недель назад
イギリス英語vsアメリカ英語!字幕付き!// British English vs American English!〔#425〕

イギリス英語vsアメリカ英語!字幕付き!// British English vs American English!〔#425〕

オーストラリア英語 vs アメリカ英語はこちら⬇︎ https://youtu.be/hwrW9mJe4FA 字幕をONにして見てくださいね☆ ① 英語トランスクリプト、②和訳、③英語&和訳同時表示、全て付けてます! 字幕の表示方法はこちら↓ http://blog.livedoor.jp/bilingirl_chika/archives/57159933.html ♡ Louis' channel https://www.youtube.com/user/FunForLouis ♡ Dave's channel https://www.youtube.com/user/daveerasmus オフ会@東北の詳細はこちら↓ http://blog.livedoor.jp/bilingirl_chika/archives/57995279.html ▶︎ レッスンリクエストはこちら☆ http://bit.ly/1M7qGUo ------------------------------------------------------------- ♡ INSTAGRAM http://instagram.com/bilingirl_chika ♡ SNAPCHAT! chika_snap ♡ BLOG http://blog.livedoor.jp/bilingirl_chika/ ♡ FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/chika.english ♡ TWITTER http://twitter.com/chika_english ------------------------------------------------------------- ◁ WORK ▷ お仕事のお問い合わせはこちら http://www.yoshidamasaki.com/inquiry/ ◁ MUSIC ▷ Epidemic Sound http://www.epidemicsound.com/ Premium Beat http://www.premiumbeat.com/ #英会話 #英語 #アメリカ英語 #アメリカ #英語学習 #英会話無料 #英語無料 #英単語 #英語リスニング #オンライン英会話 #英語発音 #英語教材 #留学 #海外旅行 #イギリス英語 #イギリス英語とアメリカ英語の違い #britishenglish #ブリティッシュ英語 #イギリス #イギリス英語発音

2 лет назад
What's it like to move to the UK?

What's it like to move to the UK?

What's it like to move to and live in London? In this video, I interview Kamila, one of my students, who moved to the UK from Poland. You will hear about Kamila's experiences of coming to the UK to live, study, and work. Kamila talks about her first impressions, the weather, the food, and the differences between her life in Poland and in London. And of course, we talk about her experience of learning English and adapting to life and work in an English-speaking country! Watch over 1000 English lesson videos for free at https://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT Gill: Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com and today's lesson is not really a lesson because we're doing something a little bit different. We're having an interview with someone I know who has come to the UK from another country and is living and working here. So, I'd like to introduce Camilla, and we're going to ask her some questions about her experience of coming to the UK and living here. So, let's get started. So, Camilla, thank you for coming. Kamila: Thank you for having me. Gill: It's lovely to see you. You're very welcome. Thank you. And so, would you like to tell us a little bit about yourself, where you're from, how you came to decide to come to the UK? Kamila: Yes, so my name is Camilla. I come from Poland. So my first language is Polish. Before I arrived in the UK I have lived in Warsaw for a couple of years. And so I worked there for a bank for over seven years in corporate banking as Product Manager. And here in London I work for a fintech startup. I'm a credit analyst of small companies. I really like my job. I enjoy it. There is a lot of going on there. My company is still developing, so I also have opportunities to develop in diverse areas. Gill: Okay. Kamila: So yeah, I'm really happy to be part of it. Gill: Oh, that's good. So, lovely. So, "fintech", that means financial...? Kamila: Financial and technology. Gill: Finance and technology. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: Used together for... Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: Financial, for funding. Kamila: Yeah, because... Yeah, exactly. Because we lent money for small companies, but making our credit decisions we use a lot of technology. We use some algorithms and so on, so that's why fintech. Gill: Okay, lovely. So, have you always spoken English? When did you first start to learn English in your life? Kamila: Yeah, so I learned English in high school and during my studies. Also after I finished my education I attended some English lessons in Poland where I was working there. And so I felt that I understood quite a lot, but I had a fear of speaking because I think that in my opinion teachers put a lot of pressure on drama, which is good of course, but there is... Because of that there is a little time for practicing speaking, so a lot of people fear of speaking. They don't feel confident enough to speak. Yeah, and that was also my case. Gill: Yes. I think I experienced the same when I was at school. It was... A lot of it was based on written, and reading and writing. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: And exams, writing exams and the tests. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: So... So... So since then, do you feel that you...? Was it when you came to the UK that you started getting more practice at speaking? Kamila: Yes, exactly. So, I feel that since I arrived here in the UK my English language skills have improved. I feel more confident. So, yeah, I decided that first couple month I would work on my English, so I read lots of newspapers, I watched some TV programs, I watched some TV series with subtitles, and I also attended private English lessons with great teacher. Gill: Oh. [Laughter] Kamila: Who has also helped me not only to improve my spoken English, but also to... It gave me some insight into English culture and politics sometimes, and everyday life, and things to see in London, so I really enjoyed that and I would recommend it to everyone who... Gill: Yeah. Kamila: Is thinking about moving to UK, for example. Gill: Yeah, so I remember we... We've had a lot of very interesting conversations about English politics. Kamila: Yeah. Gill: And about the culture and different types of food. Kamila: Yeah, yeah. Gill: And all of that. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: So... So, did you ever come to the UK for a holiday before you came to live here? Kamila: Yeah, so it's a funny story because the first school trip abroad I took part in was to London, I was 11 years old, but I can still recall some memories from this trip. For example, my first impression was that there were lots of people walking along the pavement, so it was really crowded. And also I saw a lot of people very smart dressed and it was a really big surprise for me because then I lived in small city, so you know, that smart clothes were designed for some special occasions, like wedding or something, and here I saw a lot of people so smart, like dressed up, so... Gill: Yes, being the capital city. Kamila: Yeah.

1 лет назад
BRITISH vs. AMERICAN English: 100+ Differences Illustrated | Learn English Vocabulary

BRITISH vs. AMERICAN English: 100+ Differences Illustrated | Learn English Vocabulary

Part II - https://youtu.be/1ujoK86b2QQ American & British Spelling Differences: https://youtu.be/A-KyynN0qMY Extensive list of 200+ Differences between British and American English with pictures for Kids and English learners: https://7esl.com/british-and-american-english/ American English is the form of English used in the United States. British English is the form of English used in the United Kingdom.

2 месяцев назад
How to Speak Cockney / Practice English with Paul

How to Speak Cockney / Practice English with Paul

How to Speak Cockney A lot of interesting posts by me: http://vk.com/id290352757 01:08 non-rhotic R 01:43 trap-bath-split 02:05 glottal stop 03:02 the L vocalization 04:03 TH becomes V 04:27 H is dropped 04:55 TH fronting 05:34 Practice/Examples http://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=mmum5Pp5Rq4

3 лет назад
TEST YOUR ENGLISH! Irregular Past Participles

TEST YOUR ENGLISH! Irregular Past Participles

Do we say "I have catched a cold" or, "I have caught a cold"? From present simple to present perfect, how do you know which past participle to use? Wait a minute. Use a PAST participle with the present perfect? Yes! In fact, there are two types of irregular past participles, and in this lesson, I will teach you when to use them. Be sure to complete the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/irregular-past-participles/ to confirm your understanding. Study and download a list of the most common irregular verbs in English here: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/common-irregular-verbs-grouped/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is on irregular past tenses. Okay? And in particular: "Irregular Past Participles"-okay?-of irregular verbs. So, let me just show you some examples to make it clearer what I mean. Okay. So what we're doing, we're looking at three different tenses to show how the verb changes, so the present simple of the verb, then the past simple, and then when we use the present perfect that's when you have to use the past participle. And what happens is sometimes it's the same for both the past simple and the present perfect, but with other verbs it's different. So I just have two examples here to show you, one verb where it's the same and one verb where it's different just to illustrate. And then in the second part of the lesson we will have a list of two separate sets of verbs, and I will test you on your knowledge of the past participles of those and they're listed under "same" and "different" just to clarify which ones stay the same, which ones are different. Okay. So let's have a look at some examples, and then it should all become clearer. So, first of all, this is the present simple: "I catch a cold every winter." Every winter, achoo, I'm sneezing. Oh, terrible, every winter I catch a cold. So for something that happens regularly, that is one way that we use the present simple when something happens regularly. Every, every winter I catch a cold, so the verb is "to catch", okay? So then if we put it into the past tense, the past simple and we say: "Last month... I caught a cold last month." Okay? So: "caught" is the irregular past simple form of the verb "to catch". "I caught a cold last month." I caught a cold last month, but I'm much better now. That sort of idea. Okay. So then the third example here is using the present perfect which involves using this word: "have" as an auxiliary, as an extra verb. So: "I have caught another cold!" Oh dear, I only had a cold... I caught a cold last month, and now I have caught another cold. That's one cold after another. So this is in the more recent past, the present perfect using "have": "I have caught another cold." Meaning just recently. So you can see here that "caught" stays the same, it's the same. So it's an example where the past simple and the present perfect stay the same, but let's have a look now at an example where there's a change and where they're different. Okay? So, back to the present simple again and the verb is "to write", which is an irregular verb, so: "I write to my cousin once a year." I have a cousin who is not on email, and it makes it rather inconvenient to keep in touch with her, so writing letters and putting them in the post I find a terrible job these days. I'm so used to using email for everybody, but I have a cousin who's not on email and she will not have a computer. So I have to write a letter to her. "I write to my cousin once a year." Okay? So, again, that's using the present simple for a regular action. Once a year is the regular action, I write. Okay, so then if we move to the past simple: "Last week... I wrote to my cousin last week." So that's the past simple. So, the form there for the past simple is "wrote", from "write" to "wrote", but then if we use the present perfect using the auxiliary "have": "Today... I have written to my cousin today." So recent past, it's a completed action. "I have written". Thank goodness I've got that letter written and posted, and it's gone now, so that's a job done for the year. So: "I have written", so you can see there that this form is not the same. They're the same here: "I caught", "I have caught", but with "write": "I wrote", "I have written to my cousin today." So you can see how past simple and present perfect with different verbs, sometimes they stay the same, other times they're different. Okay. So let's move on to the second part of the lesson, and we'll have a look at two lists of verbs, and I will test you on your knowledge of the past participles. Okay, so let's have a look at these which are the verbs which stay the same in the past simple and the present perfect, and I will just write that form in, but just to give you an opportunity first to think what it is. So: "to send", I send in the present.

1 лет назад
The British Royal Family: Everything you need to know

The British Royal Family: Everything you need to know

Interested in the UK and the British Royal Family? Don't know who all these dukes and duchesses are? In this lesson, I'll explain how the British monarchy works. You'll learn about the members and titles of the royal family, the history of monarchy in the UK, and how our constitutional monarchy works. I'll answer questions like: What is the queen's job? Why is there no king right now, even though Queen Elizabeth II has a husband? Who will inherit the throne?... and more. Watch this lesson to understand the royal family and the culture of monarchy in the UK. TAKE THIS QUIZ TO TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE: https://www.engvid.com/british-royal-family/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today's lesson is all about the British Royal Family. Okay, so if you probably see items in the news about our royal family, you'll have seen the queen, Queen Elizabeth; maybe her husband, Prince Philip; but they're a big family, and also not all countries have a royal family so I've just put this lesson together with a bit of information to tell you a little bit more about them. Okay, right, so the British Royal Family are also known as the House of Windsor, because Windsor is their name, which comes from Windsor. This place here, Windsor Castle is one of their homes. So years ago they decided to use the name Windsor. So, some people like the royal family, admire them. They think of them as kind of celebrities, just like film stars, and sports celebrities. They're reported in the newspapers in a similar way. You get gossip about them. In some newspapers who like to write a lot of gossip, if they've heard something, it may not be accurate, but they've heard a story about some member of the royal family, and they print the story. They might have a photograph to go with it. So they're always in the news, the royal family, for one reason or another, either a good reason or a bad reason. Pretty much every day you can hear something about the royal family or read something in the newspaper. So, some people do like them, and even, you know, think of them as celebrities, and maybe give too much time and thought to them. But then at the other extreme, some people dislike them because they're thinking of the fact that they spend a lot of money, they have all these buildings which are expensive to look after, people say: "What work do they do?" They don't seem to do any work, so why should they live such rich lives if they don't do anything? But, of course, a lot of the royal family do things all the time. They're not working for money always, sometimes they do that as well, they have jobs some of them with a salary, but some of them, they may not be working and being paid for it, but they're doing kind of diplomatic work, they're meeting visitors from other countries, they're being kind of ambassadors, that sort of thing. So they keep busy, and they're patrons of charities and they go to events, and they give their support to things and so on. So, a lot of the royal family do keep quite busy trying to live useful lives, and so I think if they didn't do that there would be a lot more sort of criticism of them. But because you can't see that they're doing things, working hard, that stops a lot of people from criticizing and saying we shouldn't have a royal family. Some people are called Republicans, and they say we should have a president instead of a queen or a king. We should have a president and a prime minister instead of a queen and a prime minister. So there are Republicans around and have been for more than a hundred years, people who wanted to get rid of the royal family, but it hasn't happened yet. Okay, so the kind of system we have in the UK, it's called a constitutional monarchy. The "monarchy" part is to do with the royal family, with the queen. The monarch, so the word "monarch" means king or queen. The "constitutional" part is to do with politics, and the government, and parliament. So what happens, really, is the government, the MPs, the ministers in parliament, they make the decisions. The government makes the decisions. And if they have a new piece of, an act of parliament, a new law, for example, the queen just has to sign it. If it's been democratically decided already by the politicians that this will become law, the queen can't just say: "No, I don't like that. I'm not going to sign it." She just has to sign it because it's gone through a democratic process. So that's why it's a constitutional monarchy. It's the monarch or king or queen governed by the parliament, by the politicians. Okay. So, let's have a look at some of the vocabulary which is fairly simple most of it. So a king or queen is the monarch, the head of state if you like. Usually any children they have will be prince or princess, so prince for male, princess of female. There are some other titles used as well, which are sort of high aristocratic titles. Duke for the male, duchess for the female.

12 месяцев назад
The Scots Language (or Dialect?!)

The Scots Language (or Dialect?!)

► Learn a language online with a native speaker today: http://go.italki.com/1Ojye8x (italki voucher) This video is all about Scots, a sister language of English (or an English dialect, depending on who you ask). Either way, it's fascinating! Thanks to Fiona Katherine Smith for her recordings and advice! Support Langfocus on Patreon http://patreon.com/langfocus My current Patrons include these fantastic people: Brandon Gonzalez, Rafael Seher, Trevor Lawrence, Patrick Batchelder, Pomax, Виктор Павлов, Mark Thesing, Auguste Fields, Jiajun "Jeremy" Liu, иктор Павлов, Guillermo Jimenez, Sidney Frattini Junior, Bennett Seacrist, Ruben Sanchez, Michael Cuomo, Eric Garland, Brian Michalowski, Sebastian Langshaw, Scott Russell, Florian Breitwieser, Divad Jones, Lorraine Inez Lil, Don Sawyer, FRANCISCO, Mohammed A. Abahussain, Benham Esfahbod, Fred, UlasYesil, JL Bumgarner, Rob Hoskins, Thomas A. McCloud, Ian Smith, Maurice Chow, Matthew Cockburn, Raymond Thomas, Simon Blanchet, Ryan Marquardt, Sky Vied, Romain Paulus, Panot, Erik Edelmann, Bennet, James Zavaleta, Ulrike Baumann, Ian Martyn, Justin Faist, Jeff Miller, Stephen Lawson, Howard Stratton, George Greene, Panthea Madjidi, Nicholas Gentry, Sergios Tsakatikas, Bruno Filippi, Sergio Tsakatikas, Qarion, Pedro Flores, Raymond Thomas, Marco Antonio Barcellos Junior, David Beitler, Rick Gerritzen, Sailcat, Mark Kemp, Éric Martin, Leo Barudi, Piotr Chmielowski, Suzanne Jacobs, Johann Goergen, Darren Rennels, Caio Fernandes, Iddo Berger, Peter Nikitin, Brent Werner, Fiona de Visser, Carl Saloga, Edward Wilson, Kevin Law, David Lecount, Joshua Philgarlic, Thomas Mitchell, Mahmoud Hashemi, Fatimahl, JC Edwards, Ashley Dieroff, Steve Decina, and MrEssex, for their generous Patreon support. Music: "Book Bag" by E's Jammy James Lord of the Land by Kevin MacLeod is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution license (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) Source: http://incompetech.com/music/royalty-free/index.html?isrc=USUAN1400022 Artist: http://incompetech.com/ "Groovy Hip Hop" by Ben Sound.

1 лет назад
Learn to speak like Jon Snow & Ygritte from GAME OF THRONES!

Learn to speak like Jon Snow & Ygritte from GAME OF THRONES!

Ever wondered about the English in Game of Thrones? In this video, I'll explain the accents of Jon Snow and Ygritte. You'll learn WHY they sound tougher and stronger than other characters! Want to try speaking in a northern accent, like the Wildlings and the Starks do? You know nothin'! I'll show you how it's done! You'll hear and be able to practice how the tougher characters from Game of Thrones and other fantasy shows and movies speak. This lesson is important for anyone living in or visiting the Seven Kingdoms, and crucial if you're planning to go north of the Wall. Don't wait! Winter is coming. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/learn-the-game-of-thrones-accent/ TRANSCRIPT "Righ' foo', lef' foo', right foot, left foot". Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today's lesson is on the northern UK accent, and we've used as our example a program called Game of Thrones, and you may be a big fan of this program. I think it's very popular. But if you're not, if you've never seen an episode of Game of Thrones, then just to explain that it's a historical, medieval, fantasy about power struggles mostly, hence the "Throne" in the title. And we're looking today at one episode which comes from series 3, episode 7 which shows two of the characters, Jon Snow and Ygritte, a young man and a young woman walking through the countryside, and they're going off to fight somewhere. So they're having a conversation on the way. So we've taken some of the words that they say during their conversations to look at how they pronounce them. So they're both speaking in a northern UK accent, which is around the sort of Yorkshire, Lancashire area about 200 miles north of London. But the actors themselves are not northern. They are performing in a northern accent, so it's possible to learn different accents. The actress actually comes from Scotland, but she speaks in normal life, in her real life she speaks with a southern London, quite a cultured-London accent; whereas the actor, the male actor who plays Jon Snow, he's from the London area and he speaks with a London accent. So they are both speaking with accents that they don't normally speak. But anyway, we're going to look at some of the words from that episode today, and I will demonstrate how they're pronounced compared with the standard RP, Received Pronunciation, southern way of saying the words. Okay. So, right. So the idea with the northern UK accent, it fits the medieval fantasy type of program more probably than the southern accent because it has a sort of historical feel to it. It sounds strong. The people who speak that way sound very strong. And this word: "gritty", "grit" is little pieces of stone. So if you think of stone it's very hard and tough, it's hard to break. So if somebody is gritty, they're quite strong and tough. So the northern accent has this strong, tough, gritty feel to it. So it fits with the historical drama where people are living quite difficult lives, and they haven't got central heating, for example, and they haven't got electricity. So, life is hard. Okay? So, okay, let's have a look at the... Some of the vowel sounds which are different from the southern. So, first of all, these examples. In sorts of southern RP, what we call "RP", Received Pronunciation, these would be pronounced: "snow", "won't", "don't", "know", "road", so it's the "o" sound. Just an "o" sound. But in the northern accent that's used in the program, it's much broader. It's: "snoow", and "woon't", "doon't", "knoow", "rooad", it's like that. Okay? So maybe you'd like to try repeating after me: "snow", "won't", "don't", "know", "road", so you have to really push your mouth forward and make it quite dark and heavy-sounding. Okay? So that's the "o" sound or the "oo" sound. Okay, it's a bit longer. You hold it on for longer as well. Right. Next one, these words would, in RP, would be: "blood", "love", "drums", and "come" as in "come on", "come on. Let's go", "come". But... So it's a sort of "ah" sound. But in the northern accent it's: "blood", and "love", "drums", "come". So, again, it's much darker and "oo", pushing your mouth forward again. So perhaps you'd like to repeat after me again. So: "blood", "love", "drums", "come on". So, I hope you know all these words. Drums, the things that you hit, a musical instrument, percussion instrument. Bang, bang, bang, bang. Drums which are used in military, you know, marches and so on for people to march along to because they give a strong rhythm. So: "drums", "come on", okay? Next one, in the south people would say: "save", "make", "lady", "brave", "day". So it's a bit like "a", like that. But again, in the northern accent it's a longer sound, and it's: "saave", "maake", "laady", "braave", "daay", so it's much sort of wider and, again, longer and darker. You make the sound a bit darker as well. So, would you like to repeat after me? "Save", "make", "lady", "brave", "day".

1 лет назад
English Vocabulary for visiting the DOCTOR

English Vocabulary for visiting the DOCTOR

When you are not feeling well, you should visit the doctor to get help. But how do you explain your problem in English? In this lesson, I will give you lots of vocabulary to help you describe what is wrong. There will also be some useful practical information about prescriptions and medicines. After watching, make sure to do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-visiting-the-doctor/ to test your understanding! TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from www.engvid.com, and oh dear, I've been working all day, I've got a terrible headache. I think I need to see the doctor. But later. I have to put you first, all of you watching. You're my priority. So, let's have a look today. The subject of the lesson is visiting the doctor when you have a headache or a pain somewhere else, if you're feeling sick, all of those things. So, visiting the doctor. Going to the GP's surgery. Now, in the UK a doctor who has a... Where you go to them in a building, it's called their surgery. It doesn't mean they cut you open and do surgery. It's not that kind of surgery. That's done in a hospital in an operating theatre, but this is like... Often it's just an ordinary house type of building, you go in, you see the doctor. It's called the doctor's surgery. And GP is sometimes used. It stands for "General Practitioner". It just means that doctor deals with all kinds of different problems. People come in off the street when they have something wrong with them. So, visiting the doctor. First of all, you have to make an appointment. It's not called a meeting. It's an appointment. You can either phone, go in. Some doctors you can book online through their website, making an appointment. Then you go in to see the doctor or possibly a nurse, some surgeries have nurses as well as doctors. You go in to see the doctor or to see the nurse. Okay? You have to describe your symptoms, like, what is wrong. My headache. Or: "Oh, feeling sick", that's a symptom, what you're feeling that is wrong, why you are there. Describe the symptoms. And we will look at some specific symptoms in the second half of the lesson. Right. You may, depending on what the problem is, the doctor or the nurse may want to give you a physical examination. They want to sort of feel things and have a look, and... So sometimes you may want someone, if you're a lady, you may want a female doctor. If you're a man, you may want to see a male doctor. In the UK it's very easy to ask for whichever you prefer. If it's a bit embarrassing, you may want to see a doctor who is the same gender as you. So that's okay. Right. When you see the doctor and the doctor decides what kind of medication you need or medicine, medication, the doctor gives you a piece of paper which is called a prescription which is for medicine, either pills... Another word for "pills" is "tablets", little things you take out of a bottle and swallow. It might be cream. If you've burnt your skin, you might have some cream to put on to heal it. Or liquid if you need something, like to drink some kind of tonic. There may be a liquid in a bottle that you have to drink. Okay. You've got your prescription, piece of paper, you have to go and get the medicine because the doctor at the surgery does not usually give you the medication. You have to go, you have to take your prescription to a pharmacy. The other name for "pharmacy" is "chemist" or "chemist shop" where they have a place where they keep lots of pills, all sorts of drugs and things, legal drugs I hasten to add. When you say "drugs", people sometimes think: "Oh, illegal." But no, these are drugs. Medicine is drugs. Okay? So you go to get your prescription, you get your medication. The instructions on the bottle or on the container tells you the dosage, how much to take. Maybe two pills per day, four pills per day, one pill after each meal, that kind of thing. That's the dosage or the dose. And how often, the frequency; once a day, twice a day, so on. Hopefully with one set of medication you will be better within a few days, but if there is still a problem after a few days and you've taken all your pills or whatever, you may have to make a return visit to the doctor. So another appointment. You may need a repeat prescription, which is more... More drugs because the first drugs haven't worked. A repeat prescription for the same thing. If the doctor decides to try different drugs, then it will be a different prescription, not a repeat prescription. Okay, so that's just the general introduction to the whole process, and we will now move on and have a look at the symptoms and how to describe what is wrong. Okay. Okay, so here we have the various symptoms that you may have to describe to the doctor or to the nurse. First of all, the word "ache" is pronounced like a "k". It looks like "h", but it's pronounced: "ake" with a "k" sound. You can have a backache. Oh, back is aching. Stomach ache.

1 лет назад
Secrets to Understand Fast-talking Americans : English Listening Practice

Secrets to Understand Fast-talking Americans : English Listening Practice

Learn 6 ways to optimize your listening practice and understand Americans who talk fast. ***Become fluent in real American English, with my free pronunciation video lesson & comprehension exercises: https://christinarebuffet.com/american-accent-survival-kit/?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=video&utm_campaign=Secrets_to_Understand_Fast-talking_Americans Decode real, unscripted conversations by fast-talking Americans with just 10 lessons. Details at https://christinarebuffetcourses.com/join-understand-real-american-english/ RESOURCES MENTIONED IN THE LESSON: Tame the Hot Potato: US & UK English: https://youtu.be/kIxHnHt_3ZI Tame the Hot Potato: What do you think of the French?: https://youtu.be/ZNZ5Oed9bqI ELLLO.ORG: www.elllo.org Understanding accents with elllo.org: https://youtu.be/t5hxsuNyHyY English Pronunciation Exercises, Part 1: https://youtu.be/iUHfUTSVOL4 English Pronunciation Exercises, Part 2: https://youtu.be/OydWUaoHOOM Exercises to Understand Real English, Part 1: https://youtu.be/mrZQz7s8WAw Exercises to Understand Real English, Part 2: https://youtu.be/FNqy-aHZ6OM TuneIn Radio app: https://tunein.com/ All Ears English: https://www.allearsenglish.com/aee-728-build-friendship-american-beyond-first-introduction/ The Tim Ferriss Show: https://tim.blog/podcast/ How to Stop Feeling Embarrassed When You Don't Understand in English: https://youtu.be/-51oRCYnyJ4 Reformulating to Be Sure You Understand: https://youtu.be/FfM-5mINETE Become a Speak English Ambassador and receive a new English lesson every week: http://bit.ly/SEwC-join You'll increase your vocabulary in English, improve your pronunciation, boost your Business English, and become fluent faster. PRACTICE ENGLISH EVERY DAY WITH ME ON SOCIAL MEDIA: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SpeakEnglishWithChristina/ LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/christinarebuffetbroadus Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/speakenglishwithchristina/

1 лет назад
Real English: Speaking on the phone

Real English: Speaking on the phone

Are you afraid to answer the phone or make calls in English? This is very common among English learners because it is more difficult to understand a new language over the phone than face-to-face. In this lesson, I will cover all the different situations and problems that come up during phone calls, and show you how to solve them easily. I will also give you useful expressions you can use over the phone to make the call go more smoothly. Don't forget to do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/real-english-speaking-on-the-phone/ to practice your phone conversation skills! TRANSCRIPT Well... Oo, actually I've got to go now because you know I'm at work. Yeah. I've just got to teach a lesson. Okay. Yeah, I'm teaching a lesson right now. Uh-huh. Okay, so I'll see ya later. Yeah? All right. See ya later, then. Bye. Bye. Sorry about that. Hi. Oo. Pen. Hi. I'm Gill from engVid, and today-sorry-we have a lesson on the phone. Not on the phone. I was just on the phone. I apologize about that. Unexpected phone call. We're looking today at: "Phone Vocabulary". Okay? So words and phrases to use to do with making phone calls, being on the phone, calling people. Okay. Maybe just with your friends, phoning your friends, but also in your job if you have to use the phone at work - this is all useful stuff for that. Okay. Right. So, phone vocabulary. First of all, if the phone rings you "answer the phone". Okay? Answer the phone. You say: "Oh, the phone is ringing. I'll have to answer the phone." Okay. Now, if you're making the call, you're phoning, you're making... Making a phone call. Okay? And somebody answers at the other end, you have to say something. So you might say: "Hello, is that Anne? Is that Anne?" So: "Hello, is that", and the name of the person that you want to speak to. That's more maybe informal if you're phoning somebody's home. If you're phoning an office, a business, you might say: "Hello. Could I speak to...?" This is a little bit more... More formal. "Could I speak to Mr. Jones?" Something like that. Okay. Sometimes when you make a phone call and somebody answers, and you're not quite sure if it's the person you want or not, you don't quite recognize the voice, so you sometimes want to ask them their name to see if that is the person you were phoning to speak to. So you can say: "Who am I speaking to, please?" It's always a good idea to use "please" when you're asking a question on the phone. "Who am I speaking to, please?" And then they will say who they are and if they are the person you want to speak to, you can continue with your call; if they are not the person you want to speak to, you would use this: "Could I speak to Mr. Jones, please?" Okay, right. Now, sometimes if you phone and the person at the other end, they want you to wait probably because they need to find the person you want to speak to, so they say: "Could you hang on?" or "Could you hold on?" That's the same thing. It just means to wait. "Hang on" or "Hold on". Or if they're being very polite or if this is you in an office taking a phone call, and it might be a customer, an important person, so you might say very politely: "Would you mind holding?" Instead of just saying: "Hang on", which is a little bit casual and informal, or even: "Hold on" which is a little... Not very... It's okay, but it's not very polite. This is much more polite: "Would you mind holding?" It's a much nicer way. "Would you mind holding, please?" is even better. Okay, so that's a good one to use. And then say this is you going to try to find somebody in the office to take this phone call, you come back. If you have to go back to the same person after they've been holding on or hanging on, or holding, you come and say: "Sorry to keep you waiting. Sorry to keep you waiting." Especially if they're a customer. And, again: "Sorry", if there is other bad news like the person they want to speak to is not there: "Sorry, she's not here." You might say: "She's not here at the moment." At the moment. Or if that person is already on the phone talking to somebody else, you can say: "Sorry, he's on the other line", meaning the telephone line. "Sorry, he's on the other line." So, when that situation happens and say it's you in an office taking the call, you don't want to just say: "Oh, sorry, he's on the other line" and then wait for the person to say something, like: "Oh well, okay then, good bye." You have to be helpful. You've got to then continue being helpful because this could be a customer or it could be the boss, it could be anybody. So you need to be helpful and say: "Sorry, he's on the other line. Can I take a message?" Okay? Take a message, to write down a message to say this person called, and either they will call again or can you call them back. So: "Can I take a message?" or "Can I give her a message?" Okay? And if it's you that's calling, you have phoned somewhere and the person is not available-okay?-you can say, politely: "Could I leave a message?" Okay?

2 лет назад
10 Most Difficult Words to Pronounce in English | British English Lesson

10 Most Difficult Words to Pronounce in English | British English Lesson

In this English lesson we look at the 10 most difficult words to pronounce in English. I could have chosen hundreds of words for this video but I've chosen these ten words because they are the ones that YOU guys asked me for. They are also the most difficult words to pronounce in English for my students during the last 10 years as a teacher. My accent is British English and specifically I speak with a London accent. There are of course many other ways to pronounce these words and there is no one correct way! Enjoy the video and tell me if there are any other words you find difficult to pronounce in the comments below. If you found this video useful, please subscribe to my channel and share this video with someone you know who is learning English too! » Website: http://www.eatsleepdreamenglish.com » Instagram: EatSleepDreamEnglish » Facebook: EatSleepDreamEnglish Music by Epidemic Sound (http://www.epidemicsound.com

2 лет назад
8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

Take your English to the next level by learning eight pronunciation tips that will help you sound like a native speaker. These tips apply to a British English accent or a neutral English accent. In this lesson, you will learn about -ed and -ing word endings, the difference in pronunciation between the north and south of England, the schwa sound, the pronunciation of the R sound in English, the tricky "th" sound, and more. Whether you want to perfect your pronunciation or learn about different accents, this video is for you. After watching, complete the quiz to test your understanding. http://www.engvid.com/8-tips-for-british-english-pronunciation/ Want to train your British accent? Get my free British accent training pack: https://jadejoddle.com/coaching-tools/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is some pronunciation tips for British English. Some of them are tips; some of them are observations that you might be interested to know. We've got eight of them, so let's get started. Pronunciation of-ed word endings. This is not specifically a British English issue. If your preference -- I don't know why I can't speak suddenly in an English pronunciation video, but that's how it is. If your preference is American English, this also applies to American English. So what I hear a lot at, sort of, around intermediate level -- sometimes upper intermediate level if you haven't had someone to correct you -- -ed word endings sound like this. I can't even do it because it's so unnatural for me. "Excite-ed shout-ed, remind-ed." It's so unnatural for me. But in fact, it's not like that. It doesn't sound like an -ed. It might sound like an /id/; it might sound like a /t/; or it might sound like a /d/. So I've got some examples here. This word, even though it's spelled -ed, makes an /id/ sound. It becomes "excited". "I'm really excited." "Shouted." "He shouted at me." "Reminded." "I reminded you to do your homework; didn't I?" And -- yeah. So now, we can talk about the ones that finish with a t sound. "Finished. Dripped. Laughed." They don't have the-ed sound. So that's an important thing to know about pronunciation. Even if it's spelled-ed, it doesn't mean it sounds like that. And what about the ones that end with a d sound, a "duh" sound. "Remembered." "I remembered what you said to me." "Called." "I called you. Didn't you hear your phone?" "Imagined." "I imagined a better future for everyone." So with those, it's a D sound. How do you know for each one? Go with what feels most natural when you're saying the word. The main thing is don't force the -ed sound at the end of the word because it's that that gives you an unnatural rhythm when you're speaking English. So moving on to -- this one's an observation, really. British English pronunciation. We have so many different accents in England. But one of the biggest divisions in our accents is -- it's between the north of the country and the south, and it's our pronunciation of these words: "bath" and "laugh", as I say them. I say them in the southern pronunciation. But if I were from the north -- if I were from the north of the country, I'd say "bath" and "laugh" because they have a different accent up there. Well, they've got loads of different accents, but they don't speak in the same way as me. So let's break it down into the actual sound. So if you're from the North, you say, "a". But we, in the South, say "au". So you say "bath", we say "bauth". And you say "laf"; we say "laugh". And you can also hear it in these two words. It doesn't have to be the first or only a vowel in the word. In the southern pronunciation, this is "commaund". But in the northern pronunciation, it's "command". And the southern pronunciation of this word is "caust". The northern pronunciation is "cast". The cast of Brookside came to London." "Brookside" was an old soap that's not on TV anymore, and it was people from Liverpool. And I was just doing the accent. Probably that's really irrelevant to you. You will never see that show, but anyway. You know, now. Next tip. I don't hear this that often, but when I do, it sounds really, really, really wrong. And I think this tip generally -- generally a good example of how -- just because we write something one way doesn't mean we say it that way. So in English -- American English, too -- W sounding words are the same as the "wh" sound in words for spelling. It actually sounds the same. So we've got two words here, "wine" and "whine". One is spelled with WH, and one is just spelled with I. "Whine" is a kind of moan or a kind of cry. Sometimes, young children whine. Sometimes, women who are upset about something are said to be "whiny".

4 лет назад
MAY or MIGHT?

MAY or MIGHT?

Is there a difference between "may" and "might"? These words have a similar meaning and are usually used to talk about a possibility or to politely ask for permission. In this lesson, you'll learn how these words differ from each other and how to use them correctly. I'll teach you the common usages of "may" and "might" and show you examples of how they are used in sentences and expressions. I'll also discuss "maybe" and "may be"—English learners and even native speakers often get confused with these. After watching, take the quiz to make sure you've understood everything! https://www.engvid.com/may-or-might/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com and today the lesson is about the two words "may" and "might", and I know these can be a little bit confusing because they are connected. "May" and "might" come from the same verb, but it's a rather strange verb that is only used in certain ways. So, I'm just going to give you a few examples to show how these words are actually used in sentences and in different situations. So, starting with "may", which as you know, is also the name of a month, it can be a woman's name, but it's also a verb. And it's used in two main different ways. It's used to express something that is possible, a possibility of something happening; and it can also be used differently to ask permission in a polite way, to say: "May I do something?" It's more polite than saying: "Can I" or "Could I". "Could I" is polite, "Can I" is less polite, but "May I" is the really nice, polite way of asking for something. Okay, so let's have a look first of all at "may" used to express something possible, a possibility. So, first of all: I've lost my gloves. I can't find my gloves that go on my hands. So I say to my friend: "Oh, I can't find my gloves." And my friend replies: "Do you think you may have dropped them in the street?" Okay. So I was walking through the street with my friend, we have arrived home. "Do you think you may have dropped them in the street? Is that possible that you dropped them somewhere?" So, that's possibility. Okay. And again, going out again, so in this colder weather, my friend says: "You'd better take a coat - it may get cold later." If we're going out in the daytime, but we're going to be out in the evening as well when it gets colder, so: "You'd better take a coat." Good advice. "Take a coat. It may get cold later." It's possible it will get cold later and you'll need to put your coat on. Okay? And then finally for these examples of what is possible, I say to my friend: "Was that John who just walked by? Someone walked by, was that John?" And my friend replies: "It may have been. I'm not sure." Because my friend didn't really see. It may have been, but I'm not really sure. So, possibly. Possibly it was John. I'm not 100% sure. Okay, so those are three examples of this first meaning of "may". And then just two examples of asking permission using "may" in a polite way. If I don't have a pen, I can say to someone: "May I borrow your pen, please?" Okay. "To borrow" is just to have for a short time, use it, give it back. Okay. "May I borrow your pen, please?" That's all very polite. "May I", "please". Okay? And then finally, somebody asks you a question and it's maybe quite a complicated thing. You can't decide. They invite you to something, you can't decide: Yes, no, not sure. You need to think about it. So, you reply: "I can't decide at the moment - may I have a few days to think about it?" Okay? And hopefully the other person is willing to give you time to think. It might be a very serious decision, so: "May I have a few days? Give me some time to think about it." Okay, so that's the two main meanings for "may". We'll now move on to look at "might". Okay, so moving on to "might". It's similar in a way, similar to the first meaning of "may", meaning possible. Okay? But the feeling with "might" is that it's a little bit less likely to be true. It's more remote, less possible. There's more doubt about it. Okay? Just slightly more doubt. So let's have a look at some examples. Okay, so I might say: "I don't feel well." And my friend might say: "Oh dear - do you think it might be something you've eaten? Some food you've eaten. Do you think it might be, possibly?" With some doubt. Maybe she cooked the dinner so she doesn't want to think it was anything she cooked. So: "Do you think it might be?" Okay? Another example, someone asks: "Where are you going for your holidays?" And I might reply: "We haven't decided yet, but we might go to Italy." It's possible, possible, but not definite. "We might go to Italy." Another example, you're waiting for your friend to arrive, Anna. "Anna hasn't arrived yet - do you think she might have forgotten?" the arrangement to meet. "Do you think she might have forgotten?" It's not... It's not like her to forget, so there's a lot of doubt there. "She might have forgotten, but mm." Okay?

2 лет назад
Intonation: Asking Questions in British English

Intonation: Asking Questions in British English

My British Pronunciation Course: https://www.etjenglish.com Skype Lessons: https://etjenglish.acuityscheduling.com In this intonation/pronunciation lesson, I teach you the basic / general rules for asking questions with a British English accent. Website: http://www.etjenglish.com Facebook: https://facebook.com/etjenglish Twitter: https://twitter.com/etjenglish Instagram: https://instagram.com/ etjenglish You can also support me and receive rewards on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/etjenglish

1 лет назад
Learn 10 English PHRASAL VERBS with

Learn 10 English PHRASAL VERBS with "UP": dress up, wash up, grow up...

Here in the U.K., we love using phrasal verbs! If you want to speak with us and understand us, you've got to learn these English expressions. In this lesson, you'll learn 10 phrasal verbs with the preposition 'up' in them. I'll explain the meaning of each phrasal verb and give you examples of their common usage. You'll learn 'dress up', 'drink up', 'wash up', 'look up', 'speak up', 'read up', 'grow up', 'mess up', 'cook up', and 'make up'. After the lesson, you can take the quiz on EngVid, where you can also watch many other free lessons on phrasal verbs. http://www.engvid.com/learn-10-english-phrasal-verbs-with-up/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. This is Gill at www.engvid.com, and in today's lesson we're going to be looking at some phrasal verbs using the preposition "up". So, a phrasal verb, just to remind you, is the verb plus the preposition. So, in this case, the preposition in all of these examples is "up", so it's being put with a main verb to turn it into a phrasal verb. Okay? So let's have a look at what we have here. So, first of all: "Children love to dress up." Okay? Children like to put clothes on, maybe their mother's clothes, put makeup on, ear rings, all sorts of things to dress up. So, that's the phrasal verb. "To dress up" is to put sort of special clothes on for, you know, just for fun really. Adults dress up as well if they're going somewhere special. "Oh, we'll have to dress up for this party", put some jewellery on and a long full-length's dress or a tuxedo with a bowtie, all that sort of thing. Dressing up in special clothes for a special occasion. Okay? Dressing up. Second one: "It's time to drink up - the bar is closing." So, "to drink up" is to finish your drink. Drink up, you're putting the glass up like that to finish your drink because the bar is closing and you have to go, so you don't want to leave your drink there. You want to drink it because you paid for it, so you don't want to waste it. Okay. "Time to drink up". Right, now, this is a common complaint that somebody in the household: "He never washes up." And we have the noun from this: "the washing up", which is about washing the dishes after a meal. "He never washes up.", "To wash up" means washing all the dishes after a meal. Okay. Now, next one, if there's a word you don't know: "I don't know that word - I'll have to look it up." So the phrasal verb is "to look up". But you'll notice that the pronoun "it" has to go in the middle there. You don't... You can't say: "I have to look up it." You have to put the pronoun in the middle: "I have to look it up." Okay. Right, so and "looking it up", that means getting the dictionary or using a computer, looking for the word to find the meaning. "Looking it up" means find the page, look down the page: "Ah, there it is. What does it mean? Ah, okay." Looking up, referring to a book or referring to a website to find out the definition. Okay, next one: "I can't hear you - please speak up." Okay? "Speak up" means get louder, say it louder. "I can't hear you. Please speak up. Turn up the volume." Okay? "Speak up". Okay, next one, you're studying and you say: "I'm having to read up on Shakespeare for the test next week." So, if you "read up" on a subject that means you're reading lots of information about the subject. You're finding books, you're finding websites, all sorts of sources to get lots of information, learning all the information, get it into your head for a test, for the test next week. "Reading up" means to gather information about a subject. Okay. Right. Now, this next one is not a very nice thing to say to somebody, especially if they're maybe over 40: "When are you going to grow up?" Okay? It's okay... If you say it to a child, that doesn't really make sense because a child hasn't grown up yet. But people tend to say this to adults because if an adult is behaving in a very silly way like a child, a childish way, somebody might say to them: "When are you going to grow up?" Meaning become mature. "Grow up" can mean to get taller, but it also means to become more sensible, more mature, you know, be a more responsible adult person. Okay. Rather than messing about and being silly. All right. Okay, next one: "You've really messed that up." So, mess... "To mess up", if you mess up... And again, you'll see another word comes in between, but this is the phrasal verb: "to mess up". "To mess something up" is to do something badly. Just a mess is untidy, not very good. If you mess something up, you've made a very bad job of it. You've not done it at all well. You've done it very badly. Okay. Next one: "What are you cooking up now?" So, "to cook up", you might think this is some food that you're cooking in the kitchen, but in this sense it's more metaphorical. If you cook something up, you're planning something.

2 лет назад
Learn English Conversation - Oxford English Daily Conversation Part 1

Learn English Conversation - Oxford English Daily Conversation Part 1

☞ Please share and like if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥ ☞ Subscribe for more: https://goo.gl/3qNzzg Learn to speak english, improve your English Vocabulary, Listening, Speaking, More and More... —————————————————————————— Good morning. It`s seven thirty. I`m Gary Fenton. Here is the news. The Prime Minister is in the United States today... ...for talks with the American president at the White House. The talks are very important for British and American... —————————————————————————— ▼ DISCLAIMER ➤ If you wanna use my uploads in your videos/streams, please give a link back to my original video, that's all. ➤ If you have problems about copyright or label and (owners) want to remove this video, please CONTACT US DIRECTLY before doing anything. We will respectfully remove it. Email : services@english7levels.com

10 месяцев назад