Learn British accents and dialects – Cockney, RP, Northern, and more!

Описание

Did you know that there are over 30 different English accents in England alone? And that's not all. Would you believe there are over a hundred different English dialects accross the world? In this lesson, I will tell you about some common British accents you might hear. You'll hear examples of Cockney, RP, Estuary, Northern, Scottish, Welsh, and many more accents. Don't miss this opportunity to add some spice to your English pronunciation and comprehension! Take the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/learn-british-accents-and-dialects-cockney-rp-northern-and-more/

TRANSCRIPT

Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is about accents in the U.K. So, U.K. accents and also dialects. Okay, so what's the difference between an accent and a dialect? Right. Well, an accent, as you know, is to do with pronunciation, how you pronounce the word. Dialect is when you have a word that only people in a certain area of the country use; it's not a national word, it's a local word that maybe people from other parts of the country, they won't even know what it means, so that's dialect. Okay. So, let's just have a look through some of the accents that we have in the U.K.

The one that you're probably learning as you're learning to pronounce English words is RP. "RP" stands for "Received Pronunciation". It's a slightly strange term. "Received" where do you receive it from? Well, maybe you receive it from your teacher. This is how to say this word. It's a slightly strange expression, but RP, it's usually referred to by the initials. And it's the kind of accent you will hear if you're watching BBC Television programs or listening to BBC Radio. Not everybody on the BBC speaks with an RP accent. The news readers tend to be RP speakers, but not always. But the strange thing is that in this country, only a very small percentage of people do speak with this accent. Apparently, just 3%, but they tend to be people in positions of power, authority, responsibility. They probably earn a lot of money. They live in big houses. You know the idea. So, people like the Prime Minster, at the moment David Cameron, he went to a private school, he went to university, Oxford, so people who have been to Oxford and Cambridge Universities often speak in RP, even if they didn't speak in RP before they went to Oxford or Cambridge, they often change their accent while they are there because of the big influence of their surroundings and the people that they're meeting. So that's RP. It's a very clear accent. So, it's probably a good idea to either learn to speak English with an RP accent, or you may be learning with an American accent, a Canadian accent, all of those accents are very clear. Okay. And being clear is the most important thing.

Okay, so moving on. RP, as I should have said, is mostly in the south of the country; London and the south. So, also "Cockney" and "Estuary English" are in the south. Okay. So, Cockney is the local London accent, and it tends to spread further out to places like Kent, Essex, other places like that. Surrey. There's a newer version of Cockney called "Estuary English". If you think an estuary is connected to a river, so the River Thames which flows across the country, goes quite a long way west. So anyone living along the estuary, near the river can possibly have this accent as well.

So, just to give you some examples, then, of the Cockney accent, there are different features. So, one example is the "th" sound, as you know to make a "th" sound, some of you may find it difficult anyway, "the", when you put your tongue through your teeth, "the", but a Cockney person may not use the "the", they will use an "f" sound or a "v" sound instead, so the word "think", "I think", they would say would say instead of: "think", they would say it like that: "fink", "fink", and the top teeth are on the bottom lip, "think". And words like "with" that end with the "th", instead of "with", it will be "wiv", "wiv", "wiv". "Are you coming wiv me?" So that is one of the things that happens with the Cockney accent.

Words like "together" would be "togever". Okay? The number "three", t-h-r-e-e is often pronounced "free": "We have free people coming to dinner. Free people." So, there can be confusion there, because we have the word "free", which has a meaning in itself, "free", but if you actually mean "three", the number three, there can be some confusion. So don't get confused by "free people". -"Oh, they're free? They're free to come?" -"No, there are three of them. Three people who are free to come." Ah, okay.

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Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce 'THE'

Learn English: The 2 ways to pronounce 'THE'

Did you know that the little word 'the' can be pronounced in two different ways? But when do you use each pronunciation? In this lesson, I will explain a simple rule that will tell you how to pronounce it in all cases. Watch this pronunciation lesson and erase your mistakes! Next, watch this lesson on the difference between 'A' and 'AN': https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1zFF7tXmfR0 Take the quiz on this lesson at: https://www.engvid.com/2-ways-to-pronounce-the/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill from engVid, and today's lesson is about the little word "the", and how to say it, how to pronounce it. You might think: "What? I know how to pronounce that word", but there are two different ways of pronouncing it, and this lesson is designed to show you how to work out which way to say it. Okay. So, the simple rule is: Before a consonant you say "thuh", but before a vowel sound you say "thee". So it's either "thuh" or "thee". So, let me just go through some examples to show you how that works. So, before a consonant sound: "thuh". "The banana", "the dog", but then we get our first exception, which is confusing because this word begins with an E which is a vowel letter, but the way it's pronounced, it has a "ya" at the beginning: "Ya. European. European", so we say: "Thuh European", okay? So that's a slight confusion to be aware of. Continuing on: "The flowers", "the house", "the man", "the people". Another exception again because this word begins with a U, which is a vowel letter, but the actual sound when you say this sound is a "ya", "university", "university". It's not: "university", it's "university". So: "thUH university", okay? And finally: "The woman, the woman". So that's "the" before a consonant sound. So, let's have a look at the other column. Before the vowel sound we say "thee", so: "The apple", "the elephant", "the ice cream", "the orange", "the umbrella". You can see here "umbrella" also begins with a U, just like "university", but it's not pronounced: "yumbrella", it's pronounced: "umbrella", so: "thee umbrella, the umbrella". Okay. And finally, here's another funny one, it begins with an H, so you might think: "Well, that's a consonant", but it is actually a vowel sound because we don't pronounce the H in this word. You may know the word "heir", which we had in another lesson about using "a" and "an". The heir is usually, well, male, and the heiress, female; but often the word "heir" is used for female as well nowadays for reasons of equality. So, but: "the heiress", "e", so it's an "e", "heiress", so that's a vowel sound, so: "the heiress". Okay? So that's another one to remember, along with the "ya" sound here. So, it's purely the way you say it which decides whether it's "thuh" or "thee". Okay? So now we'll move on to a second screen, and we'll do some sentences for you to work out how to pronounce each time the word "the" or "the" appears, so... Okay, so what I should have said at the end of the last section was the word "heir" and "heiress", I didn't explain what they meant. So, if you hadn't seen the other lesson you wouldn't... You might not know that, so "an heir" or "an heiress" is someone who inherits something, often money or property, something like that. So, okay. Right, so here is the test for you of how to pronounce the word "t-h-e": "thuh" or "thee", and as you can see, we have some sentences here. And every time the word appears I've underlined it in red just to help you to see it. So, first sentence: "The ferry crossed the Irish Sea." So, how would you pronounce the word there? Okay. So: "thuh" goes before a consonant sound, so "f" is a consonant, so: "Thuh fairy. The fairy crossed", and what about this one? "I" is a vowel sound, so it's "thee Irish Sea, the Irish Sea". So: "The fairy crossed the Irish Sea." Okay? Next one: "The right way is the only way." Okay, so how would you pronounce those two? So, "r" is a consonant, so: "Thuh right way. The right way is", "only", that begins with an "o", which is a vowel, "only". So: "thee only way. The right way is the only way." Okay? Next one, we have three examples in this sentence, so: "The answer is at the back of the book." So, what would you do there? "The answer, the back, the book", so "answer" begins with "a", which is a vowel, so it's: "Thee answer. The answer is at". "Back" and "book" begin with "b", which is a consonant, so: "Thuh back of thuh book." Okay. Next one: "The fire hasn't reached the upper floor". "Upper" means at the top of the building, up at the top. Okay, so: "fire" begins with an "f", so that's a consonant, so: "thuh fire. The fire hasn't reached", "upper" begins with "u" which is a vowel sound, so it's: "thee upper floor. The fire hasn't reached the upper floor." Okay. Right. Next one: "The girl felt at home in the empty house." So if you feel at home, you feel comfortable, you like your surroundings. Okay. So: "girl" begins with "g" which is a consonant, so: "thuh girl.

11 месяцев назад
Learn English Conversation - Oxford English Daily Conversation Part 1

Learn English Conversation - Oxford English Daily Conversation Part 1

☞ Please share and like if you enjoyed the video :) thanks so much ♥ ☞ Subscribe for more: https://goo.gl/3qNzzg Learn to speak english, improve your English Vocabulary, Listening, Speaking, More and More... —————————————————————————— Good morning. It`s seven thirty. I`m Gary Fenton. Here is the news. The Prime Minister is in the United States today... ...for talks with the American president at the White House. The talks are very important for British and American... —————————————————————————— ▼ DISCLAIMER ➤ If you wanna use my uploads in your videos/streams, please give a link back to my original video, that's all. ➤ If you have problems about copyright or label and (owners) want to remove this video, please CONTACT US DIRECTLY before doing anything. We will respectfully remove it. Email : services@english7levels.com

12 месяцев назад
Advanced British Pronunciation - Speak like a native in 5 sounds

Advanced British Pronunciation - Speak like a native in 5 sounds

Join us for intensive British pronunciation training. Learn the 5 sounds of British pronunciation that you'll need in order to sound like a native British English speaker! Support us on Patreon: http://www.patreon.com/papateachme Subscribe for more! Leave a comment below! We love hearing from you! :)

3 лет назад
What's it like to move to the UK?

What's it like to move to the UK?

What's it like to move to and live in London? In this video, I interview Kamila, one of my students, who moved to the UK from Poland. You will hear about Kamila's experiences of coming to the UK to live, study, and work. Kamila talks about her first impressions, the weather, the food, and the differences between her life in Poland and in London. And of course, we talk about her experience of learning English and adapting to life and work in an English-speaking country! Watch over 1000 English lesson videos for free at https://www.engvid.com/ TRANSCRIPT Gill: Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com and today's lesson is not really a lesson because we're doing something a little bit different. We're having an interview with someone I know who has come to the UK from another country and is living and working here. So, I'd like to introduce Camilla, and we're going to ask her some questions about her experience of coming to the UK and living here. So, let's get started. So, Camilla, thank you for coming. Kamila: Thank you for having me. Gill: It's lovely to see you. You're very welcome. Thank you. And so, would you like to tell us a little bit about yourself, where you're from, how you came to decide to come to the UK? Kamila: Yes, so my name is Camilla. I come from Poland. So my first language is Polish. Before I arrived in the UK I have lived in Warsaw for a couple of years. And so I worked there for a bank for over seven years in corporate banking as Product Manager. And here in London I work for a fintech startup. I'm a credit analyst of small companies. I really like my job. I enjoy it. There is a lot of going on there. My company is still developing, so I also have opportunities to develop in diverse areas. Gill: Okay. Kamila: So yeah, I'm really happy to be part of it. Gill: Oh, that's good. So, lovely. So, "fintech", that means financial...? Kamila: Financial and technology. Gill: Finance and technology. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: Used together for... Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: Financial, for funding. Kamila: Yeah, because... Yeah, exactly. Because we lent money for small companies, but making our credit decisions we use a lot of technology. We use some algorithms and so on, so that's why fintech. Gill: Okay, lovely. So, have you always spoken English? When did you first start to learn English in your life? Kamila: Yeah, so I learned English in high school and during my studies. Also after I finished my education I attended some English lessons in Poland where I was working there. And so I felt that I understood quite a lot, but I had a fear of speaking because I think that in my opinion teachers put a lot of pressure on drama, which is good of course, but there is... Because of that there is a little time for practicing speaking, so a lot of people fear of speaking. They don't feel confident enough to speak. Yeah, and that was also my case. Gill: Yes. I think I experienced the same when I was at school. It was... A lot of it was based on written, and reading and writing. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: And exams, writing exams and the tests. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: So... So... So since then, do you feel that you...? Was it when you came to the UK that you started getting more practice at speaking? Kamila: Yes, exactly. So, I feel that since I arrived here in the UK my English language skills have improved. I feel more confident. So, yeah, I decided that first couple month I would work on my English, so I read lots of newspapers, I watched some TV programs, I watched some TV series with subtitles, and I also attended private English lessons with great teacher. Gill: Oh. [Laughter] Kamila: Who has also helped me not only to improve my spoken English, but also to... It gave me some insight into English culture and politics sometimes, and everyday life, and things to see in London, so I really enjoyed that and I would recommend it to everyone who... Gill: Yeah. Kamila: Is thinking about moving to UK, for example. Gill: Yeah, so I remember we... We've had a lot of very interesting conversations about English politics. Kamila: Yeah. Gill: And about the culture and different types of food. Kamila: Yeah, yeah. Gill: And all of that. Kamila: Yes, exactly. Gill: So... So, did you ever come to the UK for a holiday before you came to live here? Kamila: Yeah, so it's a funny story because the first school trip abroad I took part in was to London, I was 11 years old, but I can still recall some memories from this trip. For example, my first impression was that there were lots of people walking along the pavement, so it was really crowded. And also I saw a lot of people very smart dressed and it was a really big surprise for me because then I lived in small city, so you know, that smart clothes were designed for some special occasions, like wedding or something, and here I saw a lot of people so smart, like dressed up, so... Gill: Yes, being the capital city. Kamila: Yeah.

1 лет назад
BRITISH vs. AMERICAN English: 100+ Differences Illustrated | Learn English Vocabulary

BRITISH vs. AMERICAN English: 100+ Differences Illustrated | Learn English Vocabulary

Part II - https://youtu.be/1ujoK86b2QQ American & British Spelling Differences: https://youtu.be/A-KyynN0qMY Extensive list of 200+ Differences between British and American English with pictures for Kids and English learners: https://7esl.com/british-and-american-english/ American English is the form of English used in the United States. British English is the form of English used in the United Kingdom.

4 месяцев назад
10 Grammar Errors that Drive British People CRAZY | British English Grammar Lesson #Spon

10 Grammar Errors that Drive British People CRAZY | British English Grammar Lesson #Spon

Learn about the top 10 grammar mistakes that make the British crazy! British natives hate it when people (especially other natives) make these errors! ITALKI OFFER: Buy 1 lesson, get $10 free credits at italki: http://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy Thank you to italki for sponsoring this video. Love, Lucy xoxo MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH OXFORD ENGLISH language course: https://englishll.com/lucy/ Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue £10 free makeup on FeelUnique: http://referme.to/9niUkCo Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_p... My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a #Spon in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.

7 месяцев назад
TEST YOUR ENGLISH! Irregular Past Participles

TEST YOUR ENGLISH! Irregular Past Participles

Do we say "I have catched a cold" or, "I have caught a cold"? From present simple to present perfect, how do you know which past participle to use? Wait a minute. Use a PAST participle with the present perfect? Yes! In fact, there are two types of irregular past participles, and in this lesson, I will teach you when to use them. Be sure to complete the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/irregular-past-participles/ to confirm your understanding. Study and download a list of the most common irregular verbs in English here: https://www.engvid.com/english-resource/common-irregular-verbs-grouped/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com, and today's lesson is on irregular past tenses. Okay? And in particular: "Irregular Past Participles"-okay?-of irregular verbs. So, let me just show you some examples to make it clearer what I mean. Okay. So what we're doing, we're looking at three different tenses to show how the verb changes, so the present simple of the verb, then the past simple, and then when we use the present perfect that's when you have to use the past participle. And what happens is sometimes it's the same for both the past simple and the present perfect, but with other verbs it's different. So I just have two examples here to show you, one verb where it's the same and one verb where it's different just to illustrate. And then in the second part of the lesson we will have a list of two separate sets of verbs, and I will test you on your knowledge of the past participles of those and they're listed under "same" and "different" just to clarify which ones stay the same, which ones are different. Okay. So let's have a look at some examples, and then it should all become clearer. So, first of all, this is the present simple: "I catch a cold every winter." Every winter, achoo, I'm sneezing. Oh, terrible, every winter I catch a cold. So for something that happens regularly, that is one way that we use the present simple when something happens regularly. Every, every winter I catch a cold, so the verb is "to catch", okay? So then if we put it into the past tense, the past simple and we say: "Last month... I caught a cold last month." Okay? So: "caught" is the irregular past simple form of the verb "to catch". "I caught a cold last month." I caught a cold last month, but I'm much better now. That sort of idea. Okay. So then the third example here is using the present perfect which involves using this word: "have" as an auxiliary, as an extra verb. So: "I have caught another cold!" Oh dear, I only had a cold... I caught a cold last month, and now I have caught another cold. That's one cold after another. So this is in the more recent past, the present perfect using "have": "I have caught another cold." Meaning just recently. So you can see here that "caught" stays the same, it's the same. So it's an example where the past simple and the present perfect stay the same, but let's have a look now at an example where there's a change and where they're different. Okay? So, back to the present simple again and the verb is "to write", which is an irregular verb, so: "I write to my cousin once a year." I have a cousin who is not on email, and it makes it rather inconvenient to keep in touch with her, so writing letters and putting them in the post I find a terrible job these days. I'm so used to using email for everybody, but I have a cousin who's not on email and she will not have a computer. So I have to write a letter to her. "I write to my cousin once a year." Okay? So, again, that's using the present simple for a regular action. Once a year is the regular action, I write. Okay, so then if we move to the past simple: "Last week... I wrote to my cousin last week." So that's the past simple. So, the form there for the past simple is "wrote", from "write" to "wrote", but then if we use the present perfect using the auxiliary "have": "Today... I have written to my cousin today." So recent past, it's a completed action. "I have written". Thank goodness I've got that letter written and posted, and it's gone now, so that's a job done for the year. So: "I have written", so you can see there that this form is not the same. They're the same here: "I caught", "I have caught", but with "write": "I wrote", "I have written to my cousin today." So you can see how past simple and present perfect with different verbs, sometimes they stay the same, other times they're different. Okay. So let's move on to the second part of the lesson, and we'll have a look at two lists of verbs, and I will test you on your knowledge of the past participles. Okay, so let's have a look at these which are the verbs which stay the same in the past simple and the present perfect, and I will just write that form in, but just to give you an opportunity first to think what it is. So: "to send", I send in the present.

1 лет назад
The British Royal Family: Everything you need to know

The British Royal Family: Everything you need to know

Interested in the UK and the British Royal Family? Don't know who all these dukes and duchesses are? In this lesson, I'll explain how the British monarchy works. You'll learn about the members and titles of the royal family, the history of monarchy in the UK, and how our constitutional monarchy works. I'll answer questions like: What is the queen's job? Why is there no king right now, even though Queen Elizabeth II has a husband? Who will inherit the throne?... and more. Watch this lesson to understand the royal family and the culture of monarchy in the UK. TAKE THIS QUIZ TO TEST YOUR KNOWLEDGE: https://www.engvid.com/british-royal-family/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today's lesson is all about the British Royal Family. Okay, so if you probably see items in the news about our royal family, you'll have seen the queen, Queen Elizabeth; maybe her husband, Prince Philip; but they're a big family, and also not all countries have a royal family so I've just put this lesson together with a bit of information to tell you a little bit more about them. Okay, right, so the British Royal Family are also known as the House of Windsor, because Windsor is their name, which comes from Windsor. This place here, Windsor Castle is one of their homes. So years ago they decided to use the name Windsor. So, some people like the royal family, admire them. They think of them as kind of celebrities, just like film stars, and sports celebrities. They're reported in the newspapers in a similar way. You get gossip about them. In some newspapers who like to write a lot of gossip, if they've heard something, it may not be accurate, but they've heard a story about some member of the royal family, and they print the story. They might have a photograph to go with it. So they're always in the news, the royal family, for one reason or another, either a good reason or a bad reason. Pretty much every day you can hear something about the royal family or read something in the newspaper. So, some people do like them, and even, you know, think of them as celebrities, and maybe give too much time and thought to them. But then at the other extreme, some people dislike them because they're thinking of the fact that they spend a lot of money, they have all these buildings which are expensive to look after, people say: "What work do they do?" They don't seem to do any work, so why should they live such rich lives if they don't do anything? But, of course, a lot of the royal family do things all the time. They're not working for money always, sometimes they do that as well, they have jobs some of them with a salary, but some of them, they may not be working and being paid for it, but they're doing kind of diplomatic work, they're meeting visitors from other countries, they're being kind of ambassadors, that sort of thing. So they keep busy, and they're patrons of charities and they go to events, and they give their support to things and so on. So, a lot of the royal family do keep quite busy trying to live useful lives, and so I think if they didn't do that there would be a lot more sort of criticism of them. But because you can't see that they're doing things, working hard, that stops a lot of people from criticizing and saying we shouldn't have a royal family. Some people are called Republicans, and they say we should have a president instead of a queen or a king. We should have a president and a prime minister instead of a queen and a prime minister. So there are Republicans around and have been for more than a hundred years, people who wanted to get rid of the royal family, but it hasn't happened yet. Okay, so the kind of system we have in the UK, it's called a constitutional monarchy. The "monarchy" part is to do with the royal family, with the queen. The monarch, so the word "monarch" means king or queen. The "constitutional" part is to do with politics, and the government, and parliament. So what happens, really, is the government, the MPs, the ministers in parliament, they make the decisions. The government makes the decisions. And if they have a new piece of, an act of parliament, a new law, for example, the queen just has to sign it. If it's been democratically decided already by the politicians that this will become law, the queen can't just say: "No, I don't like that. I'm not going to sign it." She just has to sign it because it's gone through a democratic process. So that's why it's a constitutional monarchy. It's the monarch or king or queen governed by the parliament, by the politicians. Okay. So, let's have a look at some of the vocabulary which is fairly simple most of it. So a king or queen is the monarch, the head of state if you like. Usually any children they have will be prince or princess, so prince for male, princess of female. There are some other titles used as well, which are sort of high aristocratic titles. Duke for the male, duchess for the female.

1 лет назад
8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

8 Tips for British English Pronunciation

Take your English to the next level by learning eight pronunciation tips that will help you sound like a native speaker. These tips apply to a British English accent or a neutral English accent. In this lesson, you will learn about -ed and -ing word endings, the difference in pronunciation between the north and south of England, the schwa sound, the pronunciation of the R sound in English, the tricky "th" sound, and more. Whether you want to perfect your pronunciation or learn about different accents, this video is for you. After watching, complete the quiz to test your understanding. http://www.engvid.com/8-tips-for-british-english-pronunciation/ Want to train your British accent? Get my free British accent training pack: https://jadejoddle.com/coaching-tools/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. I'm Jade. What we're talking about today is some pronunciation tips for British English. Some of them are tips; some of them are observations that you might be interested to know. We've got eight of them, so let's get started. Pronunciation of-ed word endings. This is not specifically a British English issue. If your preference -- I don't know why I can't speak suddenly in an English pronunciation video, but that's how it is. If your preference is American English, this also applies to American English. So what I hear a lot at, sort of, around intermediate level -- sometimes upper intermediate level if you haven't had someone to correct you -- -ed word endings sound like this. I can't even do it because it's so unnatural for me. "Excite-ed shout-ed, remind-ed." It's so unnatural for me. But in fact, it's not like that. It doesn't sound like an -ed. It might sound like an /id/; it might sound like a /t/; or it might sound like a /d/. So I've got some examples here. This word, even though it's spelled -ed, makes an /id/ sound. It becomes "excited". "I'm really excited." "Shouted." "He shouted at me." "Reminded." "I reminded you to do your homework; didn't I?" And -- yeah. So now, we can talk about the ones that finish with a t sound. "Finished. Dripped. Laughed." They don't have the-ed sound. So that's an important thing to know about pronunciation. Even if it's spelled-ed, it doesn't mean it sounds like that. And what about the ones that end with a d sound, a "duh" sound. "Remembered." "I remembered what you said to me." "Called." "I called you. Didn't you hear your phone?" "Imagined." "I imagined a better future for everyone." So with those, it's a D sound. How do you know for each one? Go with what feels most natural when you're saying the word. The main thing is don't force the -ed sound at the end of the word because it's that that gives you an unnatural rhythm when you're speaking English. So moving on to -- this one's an observation, really. British English pronunciation. We have so many different accents in England. But one of the biggest divisions in our accents is -- it's between the north of the country and the south, and it's our pronunciation of these words: "bath" and "laugh", as I say them. I say them in the southern pronunciation. But if I were from the north -- if I were from the north of the country, I'd say "bath" and "laugh" because they have a different accent up there. Well, they've got loads of different accents, but they don't speak in the same way as me. So let's break it down into the actual sound. So if you're from the North, you say, "a". But we, in the South, say "au". So you say "bath", we say "bauth". And you say "laf"; we say "laugh". And you can also hear it in these two words. It doesn't have to be the first or only a vowel in the word. In the southern pronunciation, this is "commaund". But in the northern pronunciation, it's "command". And the southern pronunciation of this word is "caust". The northern pronunciation is "cast". The cast of Brookside came to London." "Brookside" was an old soap that's not on TV anymore, and it was people from Liverpool. And I was just doing the accent. Probably that's really irrelevant to you. You will never see that show, but anyway. You know, now. Next tip. I don't hear this that often, but when I do, it sounds really, really, really wrong. And I think this tip generally -- generally a good example of how -- just because we write something one way doesn't mean we say it that way. So in English -- American English, too -- W sounding words are the same as the "wh" sound in words for spelling. It actually sounds the same. So we've got two words here, "wine" and "whine". One is spelled with WH, and one is just spelled with I. "Whine" is a kind of moan or a kind of cry. Sometimes, young children whine. Sometimes, women who are upset about something are said to be "whiny".

4 лет назад
Learn to speak like Jon Snow & Ygritte from GAME OF THRONES!

Learn to speak like Jon Snow & Ygritte from GAME OF THRONES!

Ever wondered about the English in Game of Thrones? In this video, I'll explain the accents of Jon Snow and Ygritte. You'll learn WHY they sound tougher and stronger than other characters! Want to try speaking in a northern accent, like the Wildlings and the Starks do? You know nothin'! I'll show you how it's done! You'll hear and be able to practice how the tougher characters from Game of Thrones and other fantasy shows and movies speak. This lesson is important for anyone living in or visiting the Seven Kingdoms, and crucial if you're planning to go north of the Wall. Don't wait! Winter is coming. TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/learn-the-game-of-thrones-accent/ TRANSCRIPT "Righ' foo', lef' foo', right foot, left foot". Hello. I'm Gill at engVid, and today's lesson is on the northern UK accent, and we've used as our example a program called Game of Thrones, and you may be a big fan of this program. I think it's very popular. But if you're not, if you've never seen an episode of Game of Thrones, then just to explain that it's a historical, medieval, fantasy about power struggles mostly, hence the "Throne" in the title. And we're looking today at one episode which comes from series 3, episode 7 which shows two of the characters, Jon Snow and Ygritte, a young man and a young woman walking through the countryside, and they're going off to fight somewhere. So they're having a conversation on the way. So we've taken some of the words that they say during their conversations to look at how they pronounce them. So they're both speaking in a northern UK accent, which is around the sort of Yorkshire, Lancashire area about 200 miles north of London. But the actors themselves are not northern. They are performing in a northern accent, so it's possible to learn different accents. The actress actually comes from Scotland, but she speaks in normal life, in her real life she speaks with a southern London, quite a cultured-London accent; whereas the actor, the male actor who plays Jon Snow, he's from the London area and he speaks with a London accent. So they are both speaking with accents that they don't normally speak. But anyway, we're going to look at some of the words from that episode today, and I will demonstrate how they're pronounced compared with the standard RP, Received Pronunciation, southern way of saying the words. Okay. So, right. So the idea with the northern UK accent, it fits the medieval fantasy type of program more probably than the southern accent because it has a sort of historical feel to it. It sounds strong. The people who speak that way sound very strong. And this word: "gritty", "grit" is little pieces of stone. So if you think of stone it's very hard and tough, it's hard to break. So if somebody is gritty, they're quite strong and tough. So the northern accent has this strong, tough, gritty feel to it. So it fits with the historical drama where people are living quite difficult lives, and they haven't got central heating, for example, and they haven't got electricity. So, life is hard. Okay? So, okay, let's have a look at the... Some of the vowel sounds which are different from the southern. So, first of all, these examples. In sorts of southern RP, what we call "RP", Received Pronunciation, these would be pronounced: "snow", "won't", "don't", "know", "road", so it's the "o" sound. Just an "o" sound. But in the northern accent that's used in the program, it's much broader. It's: "snoow", and "woon't", "doon't", "knoow", "rooad", it's like that. Okay? So maybe you'd like to try repeating after me: "snow", "won't", "don't", "know", "road", so you have to really push your mouth forward and make it quite dark and heavy-sounding. Okay? So that's the "o" sound or the "oo" sound. Okay, it's a bit longer. You hold it on for longer as well. Right. Next one, these words would, in RP, would be: "blood", "love", "drums", and "come" as in "come on", "come on. Let's go", "come". But... So it's a sort of "ah" sound. But in the northern accent it's: "blood", and "love", "drums", "come". So, again, it's much darker and "oo", pushing your mouth forward again. So perhaps you'd like to repeat after me again. So: "blood", "love", "drums", "come on". So, I hope you know all these words. Drums, the things that you hit, a musical instrument, percussion instrument. Bang, bang, bang, bang. Drums which are used in military, you know, marches and so on for people to march along to because they give a strong rhythm. So: "drums", "come on", okay? Next one, in the south people would say: "save", "make", "lady", "brave", "day". So it's a bit like "a", like that. But again, in the northern accent it's a longer sound, and it's: "saave", "maake", "laady", "braave", "daay", so it's much sort of wider and, again, longer and darker. You make the sound a bit darker as well. So, would you like to repeat after me? "Save", "make", "lady", "brave", "day".

1 лет назад
English Culture: Manners & How to be polite

English Culture: Manners & How to be polite

In this video, you'll learn about English manners. I'll tell you what we in England consider polite and impolite, and then go into detail about how we eat at the table, make and cancel plans, visit friends, and so much more. Some of these cultural aspects of living in England are different even from other English-speaking countries like the USA! Knowing these rules can help you make friends, get jobs, and even get into a romantic relationship. This video is especially important if you're living or travelling in England -- you could offend someone without even knowing it! Watch the video and leave your shoes ON! TAKE THE QUIZ: https://www.engvid.com/english-culture-manners/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, everyone. In this lesson we're going to look at manners in England. Here are the things that are considered polite, and the things that are not considered polite. So this is a talk about the culture, things that people do here in England, and the things that traditionally have been the most acceptable behaviour. Let's start with the things that are very important. So, I'm sure you already know this one: English people and queuing. "Queuing" is when you stand in a line when you don't... When you want something. You don't just, like, run up there to the front or push. You queue in a line. So, we queue up at the bank, for example, or we queue up when we want to get on a bus and there's some other people already there. Now, of course, in London because there are so many people and also not everyone is English so they have their manners from where they came from, you won't always see people queuing to get on the bus or on the tube, but you do generally still see people queuing up in a shop when they need to buy something. Next we have: It's very important to bring a bottle, and that means when you go to somebody's dinner party you take a bottle of wine when you go to the meal there. If you don't want to bring a bottle of wine, you can bring dessert or you can bring some flowers or some chocolates, but the general phrase and the general idea of it is bringing a bottle, as in a bottle of wine. Next we have RSVP. This is a term that comes from French: "R�pondez s'il vous plait", and this is a much more formal invitation that you get. If you're going to something, a special event like somebody's wedding... Because weddings are really expensive and they have to be organized so long in advance, people having the wedding really want to know if you're coming. So when you RSVP to the invitation it means you're definitely going, you will be there. So once you've RSVP'd, it's very, very impolite not to go. You must go if you RSVP. Next, I think that in England it's very important to be on time. We do tend to be punctual people, attend... Attend meetings at the right time, turn up to our jobs at the right time, or meet friends at the right time, most of us. Of course, there are those people who are always late for everything, but most people in general do things on time or even, like me, I always end up being 10 minutes early. I just can't help that. So I waste a lot of time being too early. Now let's look at table manners. Some of the things in the table manners' section are changing as people become more relaxed about eating and eating out. But these were all... These are all manners that people follow in more formal situations. Perhaps at home or with your very close friends it would be different. Now, I don't mean it's different for this first one. I'm not saying it's ever acceptable anywhere to slurp, burp-I can't do a burp noise. Anyway, you know what a burp is-and fart. Fart is noise from the other end. These things are never acceptable at the dinner table. Mm-mm, mm-mm. So, no eating noises or doing that when you eat. It's not acceptable. Elbows on the table, in a formal situation you're not going to do that, but relaxed with friends a lot of people do put their elbows on the table these days, not such a big deal. Drinking before... Just drinking your drink before somebody said: "Cheers" is considered impolite, but it's also a sign of being familiar with people. If you're familiar with them you don't have to go: "Oh, cheers for this drink and opportunity to drink with you." So it depends who it is. Using a mobile in the restaurant or when you're eating socially with people is considered rude, so to be like: "Oh, hold on. Let me just take this call. I'm so important, I've got to, you know, talk business", or something is considered rude, or to be like all the time texting on your phone. Of course it happens, and young people and teenagers are definitely going to do it more than older people, but on the whole it's considered impolite.

1 лет назад
English Vocabulary for visiting the DOCTOR

English Vocabulary for visiting the DOCTOR

When you are not feeling well, you should visit the doctor to get help. But how do you explain your problem in English? In this lesson, I will give you lots of vocabulary to help you describe what is wrong. There will also be some useful practical information about prescriptions and medicines. After watching, make sure to do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/english-vocabulary-visiting-the-doctor/ to test your understanding! TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from www.engvid.com, and oh dear, I've been working all day, I've got a terrible headache. I think I need to see the doctor. But later. I have to put you first, all of you watching. You're my priority. So, let's have a look today. The subject of the lesson is visiting the doctor when you have a headache or a pain somewhere else, if you're feeling sick, all of those things. So, visiting the doctor. Going to the GP's surgery. Now, in the UK a doctor who has a... Where you go to them in a building, it's called their surgery. It doesn't mean they cut you open and do surgery. It's not that kind of surgery. That's done in a hospital in an operating theatre, but this is like... Often it's just an ordinary house type of building, you go in, you see the doctor. It's called the doctor's surgery. And GP is sometimes used. It stands for "General Practitioner". It just means that doctor deals with all kinds of different problems. People come in off the street when they have something wrong with them. So, visiting the doctor. First of all, you have to make an appointment. It's not called a meeting. It's an appointment. You can either phone, go in. Some doctors you can book online through their website, making an appointment. Then you go in to see the doctor or possibly a nurse, some surgeries have nurses as well as doctors. You go in to see the doctor or to see the nurse. Okay? You have to describe your symptoms, like, what is wrong. My headache. Or: "Oh, feeling sick", that's a symptom, what you're feeling that is wrong, why you are there. Describe the symptoms. And we will look at some specific symptoms in the second half of the lesson. Right. You may, depending on what the problem is, the doctor or the nurse may want to give you a physical examination. They want to sort of feel things and have a look, and... So sometimes you may want someone, if you're a lady, you may want a female doctor. If you're a man, you may want to see a male doctor. In the UK it's very easy to ask for whichever you prefer. If it's a bit embarrassing, you may want to see a doctor who is the same gender as you. So that's okay. Right. When you see the doctor and the doctor decides what kind of medication you need or medicine, medication, the doctor gives you a piece of paper which is called a prescription which is for medicine, either pills... Another word for "pills" is "tablets", little things you take out of a bottle and swallow. It might be cream. If you've burnt your skin, you might have some cream to put on to heal it. Or liquid if you need something, like to drink some kind of tonic. There may be a liquid in a bottle that you have to drink. Okay. You've got your prescription, piece of paper, you have to go and get the medicine because the doctor at the surgery does not usually give you the medication. You have to go, you have to take your prescription to a pharmacy. The other name for "pharmacy" is "chemist" or "chemist shop" where they have a place where they keep lots of pills, all sorts of drugs and things, legal drugs I hasten to add. When you say "drugs", people sometimes think: "Oh, illegal." But no, these are drugs. Medicine is drugs. Okay? So you go to get your prescription, you get your medication. The instructions on the bottle or on the container tells you the dosage, how much to take. Maybe two pills per day, four pills per day, one pill after each meal, that kind of thing. That's the dosage or the dose. And how often, the frequency; once a day, twice a day, so on. Hopefully with one set of medication you will be better within a few days, but if there is still a problem after a few days and you've taken all your pills or whatever, you may have to make a return visit to the doctor. So another appointment. You may need a repeat prescription, which is more... More drugs because the first drugs haven't worked. A repeat prescription for the same thing. If the doctor decides to try different drugs, then it will be a different prescription, not a repeat prescription. Okay, so that's just the general introduction to the whole process, and we will now move on and have a look at the symptoms and how to describe what is wrong. Okay. Okay, so here we have the various symptoms that you may have to describe to the doctor or to the nurse. First of all, the word "ache" is pronounced like a "k". It looks like "h", but it's pronounced: "ake" with a "k" sound. You can have a backache. Oh, back is aching. Stomach ache.

1 лет назад
Real English: Speaking on the phone

Real English: Speaking on the phone

Are you afraid to answer the phone or make calls in English? This is very common among English learners because it is more difficult to understand a new language over the phone than face-to-face. In this lesson, I will cover all the different situations and problems that come up during phone calls, and show you how to solve them easily. I will also give you useful expressions you can use over the phone to make the call go more smoothly. Don't forget to do the quiz at https://www.engvid.com/real-english-speaking-on-the-phone/ to practice your phone conversation skills! TRANSCRIPT Well... Oo, actually I've got to go now because you know I'm at work. Yeah. I've just got to teach a lesson. Okay. Yeah, I'm teaching a lesson right now. Uh-huh. Okay, so I'll see ya later. Yeah? All right. See ya later, then. Bye. Bye. Sorry about that. Hi. Oo. Pen. Hi. I'm Gill from engVid, and today-sorry-we have a lesson on the phone. Not on the phone. I was just on the phone. I apologize about that. Unexpected phone call. We're looking today at: "Phone Vocabulary". Okay? So words and phrases to use to do with making phone calls, being on the phone, calling people. Okay. Maybe just with your friends, phoning your friends, but also in your job if you have to use the phone at work - this is all useful stuff for that. Okay. Right. So, phone vocabulary. First of all, if the phone rings you "answer the phone". Okay? Answer the phone. You say: "Oh, the phone is ringing. I'll have to answer the phone." Okay. Now, if you're making the call, you're phoning, you're making... Making a phone call. Okay? And somebody answers at the other end, you have to say something. So you might say: "Hello, is that Anne? Is that Anne?" So: "Hello, is that", and the name of the person that you want to speak to. That's more maybe informal if you're phoning somebody's home. If you're phoning an office, a business, you might say: "Hello. Could I speak to...?" This is a little bit more... More formal. "Could I speak to Mr. Jones?" Something like that. Okay. Sometimes when you make a phone call and somebody answers, and you're not quite sure if it's the person you want or not, you don't quite recognize the voice, so you sometimes want to ask them their name to see if that is the person you were phoning to speak to. So you can say: "Who am I speaking to, please?" It's always a good idea to use "please" when you're asking a question on the phone. "Who am I speaking to, please?" And then they will say who they are and if they are the person you want to speak to, you can continue with your call; if they are not the person you want to speak to, you would use this: "Could I speak to Mr. Jones, please?" Okay, right. Now, sometimes if you phone and the person at the other end, they want you to wait probably because they need to find the person you want to speak to, so they say: "Could you hang on?" or "Could you hold on?" That's the same thing. It just means to wait. "Hang on" or "Hold on". Or if they're being very polite or if this is you in an office taking a phone call, and it might be a customer, an important person, so you might say very politely: "Would you mind holding?" Instead of just saying: "Hang on", which is a little bit casual and informal, or even: "Hold on" which is a little... Not very... It's okay, but it's not very polite. This is much more polite: "Would you mind holding?" It's a much nicer way. "Would you mind holding, please?" is even better. Okay, so that's a good one to use. And then say this is you going to try to find somebody in the office to take this phone call, you come back. If you have to go back to the same person after they've been holding on or hanging on, or holding, you come and say: "Sorry to keep you waiting. Sorry to keep you waiting." Especially if they're a customer. And, again: "Sorry", if there is other bad news like the person they want to speak to is not there: "Sorry, she's not here." You might say: "She's not here at the moment." At the moment. Or if that person is already on the phone talking to somebody else, you can say: "Sorry, he's on the other line", meaning the telephone line. "Sorry, he's on the other line." So, when that situation happens and say it's you in an office taking the call, you don't want to just say: "Oh, sorry, he's on the other line" and then wait for the person to say something, like: "Oh well, okay then, good bye." You have to be helpful. You've got to then continue being helpful because this could be a customer or it could be the boss, it could be anybody. So you need to be helpful and say: "Sorry, he's on the other line. Can I take a message?" Okay? Take a message, to write down a message to say this person called, and either they will call again or can you call them back. So: "Can I take a message?" or "Can I give her a message?" Okay? And if it's you that's calling, you have phoned somewhere and the person is not available-okay?-you can say, politely: "Could I leave a message?" Okay?

2 лет назад
100 HARDEST English words pronunciation practice lesson (with definitions) | Learn British English

100 HARDEST English words pronunciation practice lesson (with definitions) | Learn British English

The 100 most difficult advanced British English vocabulary words with IPA phonetic transcriptions and definitions. This video will help you build vocabulary and improve pronunciation in under 20 minutes. Lucy xoxo Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH MY SOCIAL MEDIA: Instagram: @LearnEnglishWithLucy - https://goo.gl/RcwwAC Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EnglishwithLucy Twitter: @lucybellaearl - https://goo.gl/xBhfBd Edited by Connor Hinde: hinde.business@gmail.com Sign up to audible for a FREE audiobook: http://amzn.to/2ixYg3Z Then download Sherlock Holmes read by Stephen Fry: http://amzn.to/2o0ofyH FREE Grammar Checker: https://grammarly.go2cloud.org/SH1B9 OXFORD ENGLISH language course: https://englishll.com/lucy/ Earn $10 free italki credit: https://go.italki.com/englishwithlucy £26 Airbnb credit: https://www.airbnb.co.uk/c/lcondesa £15 Booking.com credit: https://www.booking.com/s/34_6/ae3283f9 Free uber ride: https://www.uber.com/invite/lucye539ue £10 free makeup on FeelUnique: http://referme.to/9niUkCo Contribute subtitle translations & have your name displayed under the video: http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_p... My Daily Makeup & Hair (You guys ask all the time!): Hair Curling & Styling: GHD Platinum Styler (I curl with straighteners): http://rstyle.me/n/ctkanzcdef7 Skin: Laura Mercier Primer - Radiance: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj94ycdef7 Urban Decay Naked Skin Foundation - 3.0: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zfcdef7 Urban Decay Naked Concealer - Warm Light: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj927cdef7 Clinique Chubby Stick Baby Tint (as blush) - Poppin’ Poppy: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj974cdef7 Soleil Tan de Chanel Bronzer: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaefcdef7 Bourjois Poudre De Riz De Java 3.5g: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj953cdef7 Eyes: Urban Decay Eye Primer Potion - Eden: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj9zucdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Brow Wiz - Taupe: http://rstyle.me/n/ctj99tcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Tinted Brow Gel - Blonde: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaabcdef7 Anastasia Beverly Hills Modern Renaissance Eye Palette: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkaaqcdef7 Maybelline Master Ink Liquid Eyeliner - Satin: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkac4cdef7 MUA Wet Look Liquid Eyeliner - Black: http://amzn.to/2iwOmzw Lips: I SWEAR BY Elizabeth Arden Eight Hour Sheer Tint - Plum: http://rstyle.me/n/ctkafpcdef7 My Recommended Books & Learning Materials (I have used all of these and fully recommend) GRAMMAR: Elementary Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yJbWQi Intermediate Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2yQCGOr Advanced Grammar in Use: http://amzn.to/2gFJzv4 VOCABULARY: Elementary Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2i2YqMK Intermediate Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2z6FE23 Advanced Vocabulary in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfgR5H PHRASAL VERBS: Intermediate Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2z5Ccos Advanced Phrasal Verbs in Use: http://amzn.to/2lfk6dF COLLOCATIONS: Intermediate Collocations in Use:http://amzn.to/2yM0WiA Advanced Collocations in Use: http://amzn.to/2yP9C9Y IDIOMS: Intermediate Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2i3dt9l Advanced Idioms in Use: http://amzn.to/2z78H5M IELTS SPECIFIC: Official Cambridge Guide to Ielts: http://amzn.to/2leGiEH Ielts Vocabulary Advanced 6.5+: http://amzn.to/2i3jKSB Ielts Grammar: http://amzn.to/2y3AaoI Recommended British Accent TV Programs and Films: Broadchurch (AMAZING TV Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6iWXZ Happy Valley (ANOTHER AMAZING Crime Series): http://amzn.to/2z6HQXl Bridget Jones (comedy film based in London): http://amzn.to/2gIcNcJ Love Actually (romantic comedy based in the UK): http://amzn.to/2z6glx3 FAQ: - Where are you from? I grew up in Bedfordshire, a county near London! - How many languages do you speak? I speak fluent Spanish and I'm learning Italian. You can see a video of me speaking Spanish here: https://goo.gl/4RVY0O - Which camera do you use? I use the Canon 60D (Discontinued - updated version here: (http://amzn.to/2z5I7K8) with a 50mm lens (http://amzn.to/2z7kgtq) - Which microphone do you use? I use the SONY ECMCS3 - Very affordable and great value for money: (http://amzn.to/2yOg9Sk) (Note that you will need this mic adapter if you want to use it with your iphone - http://amzn.to/2z6gNeD) I also use the Blue Yeti in vintage white for my voiceover work: http://amzn.to/2z4lHJa http://amzn.to/2yJPjLD - Which editing software do you use? Final Cut Pro X Advertising Standards: Anything with http://amzn.to, http://rstyle.me, https://www.airbnb.co.uk, https://www.uber.com/, https://go.italki.com, https://www.booking.com, https://englishll.com is an affiliate link. I earn commission through these links. If there is any sponsored content I place a notification in the title of the video, plus additional mention of the sponsorship in the description.

4 месяцев назад
MAY or MIGHT?

MAY or MIGHT?

Is there a difference between "may" and "might"? These words have a similar meaning and are usually used to talk about a possibility or to politely ask for permission. In this lesson, you'll learn how these words differ from each other and how to use them correctly. I'll teach you the common usages of "may" and "might" and show you examples of how they are used in sentences and expressions. I'll also discuss "maybe" and "may be"—English learners and even native speakers often get confused with these. After watching, take the quiz to make sure you've understood everything! https://www.engvid.com/may-or-might/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill at www.engvid.com and today the lesson is about the two words "may" and "might", and I know these can be a little bit confusing because they are connected. "May" and "might" come from the same verb, but it's a rather strange verb that is only used in certain ways. So, I'm just going to give you a few examples to show how these words are actually used in sentences and in different situations. So, starting with "may", which as you know, is also the name of a month, it can be a woman's name, but it's also a verb. And it's used in two main different ways. It's used to express something that is possible, a possibility of something happening; and it can also be used differently to ask permission in a polite way, to say: "May I do something?" It's more polite than saying: "Can I" or "Could I". "Could I" is polite, "Can I" is less polite, but "May I" is the really nice, polite way of asking for something. Okay, so let's have a look first of all at "may" used to express something possible, a possibility. So, first of all: I've lost my gloves. I can't find my gloves that go on my hands. So I say to my friend: "Oh, I can't find my gloves." And my friend replies: "Do you think you may have dropped them in the street?" Okay. So I was walking through the street with my friend, we have arrived home. "Do you think you may have dropped them in the street? Is that possible that you dropped them somewhere?" So, that's possibility. Okay. And again, going out again, so in this colder weather, my friend says: "You'd better take a coat - it may get cold later." If we're going out in the daytime, but we're going to be out in the evening as well when it gets colder, so: "You'd better take a coat." Good advice. "Take a coat. It may get cold later." It's possible it will get cold later and you'll need to put your coat on. Okay? And then finally for these examples of what is possible, I say to my friend: "Was that John who just walked by? Someone walked by, was that John?" And my friend replies: "It may have been. I'm not sure." Because my friend didn't really see. It may have been, but I'm not really sure. So, possibly. Possibly it was John. I'm not 100% sure. Okay, so those are three examples of this first meaning of "may". And then just two examples of asking permission using "may" in a polite way. If I don't have a pen, I can say to someone: "May I borrow your pen, please?" Okay. "To borrow" is just to have for a short time, use it, give it back. Okay. "May I borrow your pen, please?" That's all very polite. "May I", "please". Okay? And then finally, somebody asks you a question and it's maybe quite a complicated thing. You can't decide. They invite you to something, you can't decide: Yes, no, not sure. You need to think about it. So, you reply: "I can't decide at the moment - may I have a few days to think about it?" Okay? And hopefully the other person is willing to give you time to think. It might be a very serious decision, so: "May I have a few days? Give me some time to think about it." Okay, so that's the two main meanings for "may". We'll now move on to look at "might". Okay, so moving on to "might". It's similar in a way, similar to the first meaning of "may", meaning possible. Okay? But the feeling with "might" is that it's a little bit less likely to be true. It's more remote, less possible. There's more doubt about it. Okay? Just slightly more doubt. So let's have a look at some examples. Okay, so I might say: "I don't feel well." And my friend might say: "Oh dear - do you think it might be something you've eaten? Some food you've eaten. Do you think it might be, possibly?" With some doubt. Maybe she cooked the dinner so she doesn't want to think it was anything she cooked. So: "Do you think it might be?" Okay? Another example, someone asks: "Where are you going for your holidays?" And I might reply: "We haven't decided yet, but we might go to Italy." It's possible, possible, but not definite. "We might go to Italy." Another example, you're waiting for your friend to arrive, Anna. "Anna hasn't arrived yet - do you think she might have forgotten?" the arrangement to meet. "Do you think she might have forgotten?" It's not... It's not like her to forget, so there's a lot of doubt there. "She might have forgotten, but mm." Okay?

2 лет назад
Learn 10 English PHRASAL VERBS with

Learn 10 English PHRASAL VERBS with "UP": dress up, wash up, grow up...

Here in the U.K., we love using phrasal verbs! If you want to speak with us and understand us, you've got to learn these English expressions. In this lesson, you'll learn 10 phrasal verbs with the preposition 'up' in them. I'll explain the meaning of each phrasal verb and give you examples of their common usage. You'll learn 'dress up', 'drink up', 'wash up', 'look up', 'speak up', 'read up', 'grow up', 'mess up', 'cook up', and 'make up'. After the lesson, you can take the quiz on EngVid, where you can also watch many other free lessons on phrasal verbs. http://www.engvid.com/learn-10-english-phrasal-verbs-with-up/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. This is Gill at www.engvid.com, and in today's lesson we're going to be looking at some phrasal verbs using the preposition "up". So, a phrasal verb, just to remind you, is the verb plus the preposition. So, in this case, the preposition in all of these examples is "up", so it's being put with a main verb to turn it into a phrasal verb. Okay? So let's have a look at what we have here. So, first of all: "Children love to dress up." Okay? Children like to put clothes on, maybe their mother's clothes, put makeup on, ear rings, all sorts of things to dress up. So, that's the phrasal verb. "To dress up" is to put sort of special clothes on for, you know, just for fun really. Adults dress up as well if they're going somewhere special. "Oh, we'll have to dress up for this party", put some jewellery on and a long full-length's dress or a tuxedo with a bowtie, all that sort of thing. Dressing up in special clothes for a special occasion. Okay? Dressing up. Second one: "It's time to drink up - the bar is closing." So, "to drink up" is to finish your drink. Drink up, you're putting the glass up like that to finish your drink because the bar is closing and you have to go, so you don't want to leave your drink there. You want to drink it because you paid for it, so you don't want to waste it. Okay. "Time to drink up". Right, now, this is a common complaint that somebody in the household: "He never washes up." And we have the noun from this: "the washing up", which is about washing the dishes after a meal. "He never washes up.", "To wash up" means washing all the dishes after a meal. Okay. Now, next one, if there's a word you don't know: "I don't know that word - I'll have to look it up." So the phrasal verb is "to look up". But you'll notice that the pronoun "it" has to go in the middle there. You don't... You can't say: "I have to look up it." You have to put the pronoun in the middle: "I have to look it up." Okay. Right, so and "looking it up", that means getting the dictionary or using a computer, looking for the word to find the meaning. "Looking it up" means find the page, look down the page: "Ah, there it is. What does it mean? Ah, okay." Looking up, referring to a book or referring to a website to find out the definition. Okay, next one: "I can't hear you - please speak up." Okay? "Speak up" means get louder, say it louder. "I can't hear you. Please speak up. Turn up the volume." Okay? "Speak up". Okay, next one, you're studying and you say: "I'm having to read up on Shakespeare for the test next week." So, if you "read up" on a subject that means you're reading lots of information about the subject. You're finding books, you're finding websites, all sorts of sources to get lots of information, learning all the information, get it into your head for a test, for the test next week. "Reading up" means to gather information about a subject. Okay. Right. Now, this next one is not a very nice thing to say to somebody, especially if they're maybe over 40: "When are you going to grow up?" Okay? It's okay... If you say it to a child, that doesn't really make sense because a child hasn't grown up yet. But people tend to say this to adults because if an adult is behaving in a very silly way like a child, a childish way, somebody might say to them: "When are you going to grow up?" Meaning become mature. "Grow up" can mean to get taller, but it also means to become more sensible, more mature, you know, be a more responsible adult person. Okay. Rather than messing about and being silly. All right. Okay, next one: "You've really messed that up." So, mess... "To mess up", if you mess up... And again, you'll see another word comes in between, but this is the phrasal verb: "to mess up". "To mess something up" is to do something badly. Just a mess is untidy, not very good. If you mess something up, you've made a very bad job of it. You've not done it at all well. You've done it very badly. Okay. Next one: "What are you cooking up now?" So, "to cook up", you might think this is some food that you're cooking in the kitchen, but in this sense it's more metaphorical. If you cook something up, you're planning something.

2 лет назад
How to Speak Cockney / Practice English with Paul

How to Speak Cockney / Practice English with Paul

How to Speak Cockney A lot of interesting posts by me: http://vk.com/id290352757 01:08 non-rhotic R 01:43 trap-bath-split 02:05 glottal stop 03:02 the L vocalization 04:03 TH becomes V 04:27 H is dropped 04:55 TH fronting 05:34 Practice/Examples http://www.youtube.com/edit?video_id=mmum5Pp5Rq4

3 лет назад
Learn English Vocabulary: TOUCH or FEEL?

Learn English Vocabulary: TOUCH or FEEL?

The words 'touch' and 'feel' both seem to mean the same thing, so how do you know which one to use? While they are similar words, we use them differently. If you want to use them correctly, you need to know the difference between them. In this English vocabulary lesson, I'll define 'touch' and 'feel', and show you example sentences where each is used. By the end of the lesson you'll know when to use each word depending on the context. TAKE THE QUIZ: http://www.engvid.com/learn-english-vocabulary-touch-or-feel/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from engVid, and today we have a lesson about two verbs: "to touch" and "to feel", and we're going to look at how they are used. They... Because they mean something very similar, it's to do with the same sort of action of touching or feeling, it's very easy to get them confused. So sometimes you use "touch", other times you use "feel". So, I'm going to show a few examples just to illustrate how they are used. Okay, so let's first have a look at the verb "to touch", and it's an active verb. It's something you actively do, physically. If you just touch... Touch something like that, it can be quite a light, brief, a short time, touching. It's not something that you hold on to. It's short, usually, touch. Or if you just touch someone on the arm to get their attention or on the shoulder. Okay. So, here's the first example, then: "I touched the kettle to see if it was still hot." And if you're not sure what a kettle is, you boil water in the kettle to make a cup of tea or coffee, so you boil the water in an electric kettle or on the gas. So: "I touched"-past tense-"the kettle to see if it was still hot". So, "touched". So, with something that might be very hot, you don't want to hold your hand on it for too long because you could burn your hand, so you just touched it lightly like that. So it's a short, quick touch to see if it's hot. Okay? And second example: "If you touch the cat, she might scratch you!" So it's a warning. "To scratch", if the cat doesn't like to be touched... Some cats don't like people to touch them, especially if they're total strangers. Cats are very particular, I think. So if you touch the cat, be careful, she might scratch you with the sharp claws. So, again, if you were going to just stroke the cat like that and: "No, don't stroke the cat. She doesn't like it." So: "If you touch the cat, she might scratch you! Be careful." Okay? So it's a sort of light, short time of contact. Okay. So moving on to "feel", this is also quite an active verb. For example, it's still making contact like this. For example, this material, like on a blouse or a shirt: "This material is so silky"-kind of silk-"just feel it!" Oo, just feel. Oh, lovely. Soft and smooth. Isn't that nice? So with "feel" you sort of... It sort of suggests a longer time that you're in contact with what it is that you're feeling. Okay, so: "Just feel it", like that. And another example: "I'm feeling around in the dark." So we're adding a preposition here. "To feel around in the dark". For example, if you're sleeping in a friend's house and you've never been there before, you wake up in the middle of the night, you know that you're not in your own home, it's completely dark and you want to put the light on for some reason, to see the time or whatever. So, you get out of bed and you're not quite sure... You want to put the light on, you're not quite sure where it is, so you're doing this in the dark, feeling around for the wall, trying to find the switch on the wall or find a lamp, turn on the lamp. You don't know the room, so you're having to feel around. So it's about stretching out your hand, making contact with things to find your way to where you're trying to get. So: "I'm feeling around in the dark." And then for people who shave... I luckily don't have to shave. Some women do, apparently. But I shouldn't joke about that because it's not funny. If you shaved you might: "Feel your face after shaving", to see if it's rough or smooth. Okay? To see if you... It's a good razor, a good sharp, razor that you've used. Or an electric razor that goes: "Mmmm", like that sort of sound. So you feel your face after shaving to see if it's nice and smooth. So, again, making contact and for quite a long time. Not just touching. Touching would be like that. But feeling is more like that. Okay. Okay, so that's "touch" and "feel". And there's one other use of the verb "to feel", a slightly different way of using it in a kind of more general way to do with how you feel inside yourself, emotionally or in your head, how you're thinking. Or physically, it can be physically as well. So if you walk into a room and you say: "It feels cold in here!" Okay? Just the physical sensation is: "Oo, it's cold. We need to put some heating on." So that's the physical feeling that you're sort of receiving a signal that the temperature is low.

2 лет назад
Spelling & Pronunciation - Words with Silent Letters

Spelling & Pronunciation - Words with Silent Letters

http://www.engvid.com/ Write, knife, should, could, would... all of these words have silent letters! Learn which groups of words in English have silent letters, and how to pronounce these tricky words! Test your understanding of the lesson with the quiz at spelling-http://www.engvid.com/spelling-pronunciation-silent-letters/

7 лет назад
UK accent RP Received Pronunciation

UK accent RP Received Pronunciation

Mr Robinson talks about 'RP' in the UK. Although his speech itself can be 'RP', self-described 'Northern RP', a definite example is given at the end of the film where the sentences are short and easy to understand, therefore, you may try to imitate, should you wish to learn how to speak English. The clip is from 'Wedgwood Jasper', one of our films on YouTube. Hugh Grant is also talked about. For your info, BBC's C initially stood for Company instead of Corporation and Tony Blair studied at fettes in Edinburgh.

8 лет назад
How to use the verb 'GET' in English

How to use the verb 'GET' in English

The verb "get" is very common in English. This verb can be used in so many different ways, including in some expressions. In this lesson, I will give you many examples of how to use it, like "to get going somewhere", "to get well", "to get over it", and many more. So why not get started, get into it, and watch the video? Take the quiz on this lesson: http://www.engvid.com/how-to-use-the-verb-get-in-english/ Make sure to watch my lesson on 11 ways to use "get": https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cTkYJX_8Ls TRANSCRIPT Hi. I'm Gill from www.engvid.com, and today we're going to have a look at the verb "to get", and the different uses of it, or some of the different uses. It's used all the time and in different ways. So, there are too many uses to look at in one lesson, so there will be another lesson on this as well. So, look out for that one, too. Okay? So, the verb "to get", it's a very, very common English word, used all the time in many different ways. So, let's start by looking at some very ordinary uses of the verb "to get". So, you could "get wet". If you're out in the rain: "Aw, I got wet in the rain." So: "got", past tense. Or you can say: "Don't get wet. It's going to rain." So: "to get wet". "To get thirsty". If you haven't had a drink for a long time, you get thirsty, you need a drink. "To get annoyed", you can get annoyed, angry about something or about someone, the way somebody behaves. Okay? You can get... "Get tired". If you've been working all day, you get really tired late at night and you need to go to bed. You can "get drunk", which means drinking a lot of alcohol so that you're sort of reeling around, and maybe falling on the floor. Not a good idea. So, you can "get drunk". Or you can say to somebody who's going to a party: "Don't get drunk." Okay? "You'll feel terrible the next day. Don't get drunk." So: "drunk", it's always to do with alcohol. You can say: "I have drunk a class of water." That's just the past tense of "to drink", but in this sense, it's to do with alcohol. Okay, you can "get married". Well, you can "get engaged", "get married", "get divorced", all of those for "get". Use "get". Okay? You can "get the flu" or "a cold", when you're sneezing and you're feeling really ill, the flu. You can "get the sack", which means losing your job. It's a colloquial expression that means to lose your job: "the sack". A sack is like a... Something, a container, a sack made of cloth, usually, or plastic, you can have a plastic sack. But the... It's just an expression for losing your job. I think you're given a bag with all your belongings in to take away with you so that you don't leave all your stuff in a drawer somewhere in the office where you don't work anymore, so that may be the reason. "To get the sack". And then, having gotten the sack, you can "get a new job", where hopefully things will go better. "To get a new job". And "to get ready", to get ready, put some nice clothes on to go out to a party. Get ready to go to work, get ready to do something. Okay. So, that's all very, very simple uses of the verb "to get". Right, so now let's have a look at some imperatives, which means telling people what to do or what not to do sometimes. They're like orders: "Do this, do that." Okay? So, and some can be quite rude, so you have to be careful how you use them because telling people what to do isn't always very nice. So, if you say to someone: "Get out!" that is very strong. If you ask them: "Get out". If someone walked in here now, I might say... Well, I wouldn't, but I could say: "Get out. We're filming." But I would probably say: "Oh. Do you mind? We're filming at the moment, so please, would you mind leaving the room?" But a rude person would say: "Get out! We're filming." So: "Get out!" "Get in", maybe your friend is... Has arrived with the car, ready to go on a trip, and she's waiting for you to get into the car as well, and she's in a hurry, so she might say: "Get in, get in, we're ready to go. We don't want to be late. Get in!" "Get off", so again, in the car: "We need to get off now." We can go, we can get off. Or if someone is standing on a chair, and you... They're spoiling the chair with their dirty shoes, you can say: "Get off the chair. Get off the chair. You're making it dirty." Okay? "Get up", if you're in bed in the morning, you have to get up, get dressed, get washed, all of those things. Get ready to go out. "Get up". If you're on some very nice grass that you're not supposed to be on, somebody might shout: "Get off the grass!" because you could be spoiling it, and turning it into muddy tracks. And this one is quite a nice one, because this... These words appear on a card. You can buy a greetings card from a shop that says: "Get well soon!" If you're ill, if somebody is ill either at home or in hospital, and you feel sorry for them, you want them to get better, you can send a card that says: "Get well soon." Okay?

2 лет назад